Glucose signaling in the brain and periphery to memory

Md. Shamim Hossain, Yutaka Oomura, Takehiko Fujino, Koichi Akashi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Glucose has many diverse physiological roles such as energy metabolism, appetite control and memory consolidation. We recently reported that memory-related gene expression is epigenetically controlled in murine brain cells and that glucose can regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner. However, the literature reviews have indicated that glucose can also regulate gut cells to release incretins which might play a role in memory processes directly or indirectly by vagus nerve stimulation. In this review, we discussed the effects of glucose on the gut and brain, aiming to understand more in-depth the role of glucose in memory function. In addition, we also discussed the alteration of glucose-signaling in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and a possible link to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Glucose
Brain
Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Incretins
Gene Expression
Appetite
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Energy Metabolism
Alzheimer Disease
Pathology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Glucose signaling in the brain and periphery to memory. / Hossain, Md. Shamim; Oomura, Yutaka; Fujino, Takehiko; Akashi, Koichi.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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