Glucosinolate distribution in the aerial parts of sel1-10, a disruption mutant of the sulfate transporter SULTR1;2, in mature arabidopsis thaliana plants

Tomomi Morikawa-Ichinose, Sun Ju Kim, Alaa Allahham, Ryota Kawaguchi, Akiko Maruyama-Nakashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Plants take up sulfur (S), an essential element for all organisms, as sulfate, which is mainly attributed to the function of SULTR1;2 in Arabidopsis. A disruption mutant of SULTR1;2, sel1-10, has been characterized with phenotypes similar to plants grown under sulfur deficiency (−S). Although the effects of −S on S metabolism were well investigated in seedlings, no studies have been performed on matureArabidopsis plants. To study further the effects of −S on S metabolism, we analyzed the accumulation and distribution of S-containing compounds in different parts of mature sel1-10 and of the wild-type (WT) plants grown under long-day conditions. While the levels of sulfate, cysteine, and glutathione were almost similar between sel1-10 and WT, levels of glucosinolates (GSLs) differed between them depending on the parts of the plant. GSLs levels in the leaves and stems were generally lower in sel1-10 than those in WT. However,sel1-10 seeds maintained similar levels of aliphatic GSLs to those in WT plants. GSL accumulation in reproductive tissues is likely to be prioritized even when sulfate supply is limited in sel1-10 for its role in S storage and plant defense.

Original languageEnglish
Article number95
JournalPlants
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

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glucosinolates
aerial parts
transporters
sulfates
Arabidopsis thaliana
sulfate
mutants
sulfur
metabolism
plant defense
plant anatomy
cysteine
distribution
mutant
phenotype
glutathione
Arabidopsis
stem
seedling
seed

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Glucosinolate distribution in the aerial parts of sel1-10, a disruption mutant of the sulfate transporter SULTR1;2, in mature arabidopsis thaliana plants. / Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi; Kim, Sun Ju; Allahham, Alaa; Kawaguchi, Ryota; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko.

In: Plants, Vol. 8, No. 4, 95, 04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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