Glyteer, soybean tar, impairs IL-4/Stat6 signaling in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells: The basis of its therapeutic effect on atopic dermatitis

Masaki Takemura, Takeshi Nakahara, Akiko Hashimoto-Hachiya, Masutaka Furue, Gaku Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of T helper (Th)2 cytokines including Interleukin 4 (IL-4) in the pathogenesis of AD. Since epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) produce CCL17 and CCL22 that chemoattract Th2 cells, interfering with CCL17 and CCL22 production from LCs and dermal myeloid DCs may be beneficial in the treatment of AD. To investigate this, we stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) with IL-4. IL-4 stimulation produced Ccl17 and Ccl22, which was attenuated by soybean tar Glyteer, a known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) activator. Notably, Glyteer treatment blocked the nuclear translocation of Stat6 induced by IL-4 stimulation, suggesting that this treatment impairs the IL-4/Stat6 signaling pathway in BMDCs. Unexpectedly, Glyteer treatment did not potently upregulate the expression of Cyp1a1, a specific Ahr-responsive gene, suggesting that its inhibitory machinery for Ccl17 and Ccl22 expression is likely to operate in an Ahr-independent manner. These findings indicate that Glyteer may exhibit therapeutic potential for AD by downregulating the CCL17 and CCL22 production from DCs in a Th2-deviated microenvironment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1169
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 12 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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