H, C, and N isotopic compositions of Hayabusa category 3 organic samples

Motoo Ito, Masayuki Uesugi, Hiroshi Naraoka, Hikaru Yabuta, Fumio Kitajima, Hajime Mita, Yoshinori Takano, Yuzuru Karouji, Toru Yada, Yukihiro Ishibashi, Tatsuaki Okada, Masanao Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Since isotopic ratios of H, C, and N are sensitive indicators for determining extraterrestrial organics, we have measured these isotopes of Hayabusa category 3 organic samples of RB-QD04-0047-02, RA-QD02-0120, and RB-QD04-0001 with ion imaging using a NanoSIMS ion microprobe. All samples have H, C, and N isotopic compositions that are terrestrial within errors (approximately ±50‰ for H, approximately ±9‰ for C, and approximately ±2‰ for N). None of these samples contain micrometer-sized hot spots with anomalous H, C, and N isotopic compositions, unlike previous isotope data for extraterrestrial organic materials, i.e., insoluble organic matters (IOMs) and nano-globules in chondrites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and cometary dust particles. We, therefore, cannot conclude whether these Hayabusa category 3 samples are terrestrial contaminants or extraterrestrial materials because of the H, C, and N isotopic data. A coordinated study using microanalysis techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), NanoSIMS ion microprobe, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and transmission electron microscopy/scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) is required to characterize Hayabusa category 3 samples in more detail for exploring their origin and nature.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102
Journalearth, planets and space
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 13 2014

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ion microprobe
transmission electron microscopy
isotopic composition
isotope
interplanetary dust
ion
Raman spectroscopy
isotopic ratio
chondrite
Fourier transform
spectrometry
mass spectrometry
scanning electron microscopy
spectroscopy
dust
organic matter
isotopes
pollutant
ions
globules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

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H, C, and N isotopic compositions of Hayabusa category 3 organic samples. / Ito, Motoo; Uesugi, Masayuki; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kitajima, Fumio; Mita, Hajime; Takano, Yoshinori; Karouji, Yuzuru; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Okada, Tatsuaki; Abe, Masanao.

In: earth, planets and space, Vol. 66, No. 1, 102, 13.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ito, M, Uesugi, M, Naraoka, H, Yabuta, H, Kitajima, F, Mita, H, Takano, Y, Karouji, Y, Yada, T, Ishibashi, Y, Okada, T & Abe, M 2014, 'H, C, and N isotopic compositions of Hayabusa category 3 organic samples', earth, planets and space, vol. 66, no. 1, 102. https://doi.org/10.1186/1880-5981-66-102
Ito, Motoo ; Uesugi, Masayuki ; Naraoka, Hiroshi ; Yabuta, Hikaru ; Kitajima, Fumio ; Mita, Hajime ; Takano, Yoshinori ; Karouji, Yuzuru ; Yada, Toru ; Ishibashi, Yukihiro ; Okada, Tatsuaki ; Abe, Masanao. / H, C, and N isotopic compositions of Hayabusa category 3 organic samples. In: earth, planets and space. 2014 ; Vol. 66, No. 1.
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