Halt and recovery of illusory motion perception from peripherally viewed static images

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We quantitatively investigated the halt and recovery of illusory motion perception in static images. With steady fixation, participants viewed images causing four different motion illusions. The results showed that the time courses of the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion (i. e., "Rotating Snakes") were very similar, while the Ouchi and Enigma illusions showed quite a different trend. When participants viewed images causing the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion, they typically experienced disappearance of the illusory motion within several seconds. After a variable interstimulus interval (ISI), the images were presented again in the same retinal position. The magnitude of the illusory motion from the second image presentation increased as the ISI became longer. This suggests that the same adaptation process either directly causes or attenuates both the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1823-1832
Number of pages10
JournalAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2011

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Motion Perception
Recovery
Illusion
Snakes
cause
trend

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Sensory Systems
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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abstract = "We quantitatively investigated the halt and recovery of illusory motion perception in static images. With steady fixation, participants viewed images causing four different motion illusions. The results showed that the time courses of the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion (i. e., {"}Rotating Snakes{"}) were very similar, while the Ouchi and Enigma illusions showed quite a different trend. When participants viewed images causing the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion, they typically experienced disappearance of the illusory motion within several seconds. After a variable interstimulus interval (ISI), the images were presented again in the same retinal position. The magnitude of the illusory motion from the second image presentation increased as the ISI became longer. This suggests that the same adaptation process either directly causes or attenuates both the Fraser-Wilcox illusion and the modified Fraser-Wilcox illusion.",
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