Hemodynamic and biochemical changes during normothermic and hypothermic sanguinous perfusion of the porcine hepatic graft

Tetsuo Ikeda, Katsuhiko Yanaga, Guy Lebeau, Hidefumi Higashi, Saburo Kakizoe, Thomas E. Starzl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using an ex vivo liver sanguinous perfusion system, hemodynamic and biochemical changes of the porcine livers were studied, which were preserved cold (4°C) for 24 hr in University of Wisconsin solution and reperfused with normothermic (37°C) (n=8) or hypothermic (32°C) (n=8) blood for 3 hr. Six more livers were reperfused with normothermic blood (37°C) immediately after procurement as controls. The total hepatic blood flow was adjusted to 1 ml/min/g liver weight, in which hepatic artery and portal vein flows were administered at a 1:2 ratio. In livers stored cold for 24 hr in UW solution and perfused normothermically, a statistically higher hepatic artery resistance was exhibited at 30 an 60 min after reperfusion (P<0.05), and there was lower bile output (P<0.05) at 90 and 120 min as compared to the controls. In livers stored cold for 24 hr in UW solution and perfused hypothermically, as compared to ones perfused normothermically, statistically higher hepatic- artery and portal-vein resistances (P<0.05) were observed throughout the perfusion period and 60 min= after reperfusion, respectively. In addition, bile output and oxygen consumption of these livers were statistically lower than those of ones perfused normothermically (P<O.05). In contrast, chemistries of the perfusat of livers perfused hypothermically were comparable to ones perfused normothermically. Histologic examination of the liver perfused hypothermically demonstrated hepatic arterial and/or portal venous congestion and mild-to-moderate hemorrhage in the portal triads. This study suggests that livers preserved for a prolonged period of time demonstrate a high hepatic arterial resistance shortly after revascularization, and that recipient hypothermia after revascularization may be a risk factor for the development of hepatic arterial thrombosis following liver transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)564-567
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1990

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Swine
Perfusion
Hemodynamics
Transplants
Liver
Hepatic Artery
Portal Vein
Bile
Reperfusion
Hepatic Veins
Hyperemia
Hypothermia
Oxygen Consumption
Liver Transplantation
Thrombosis
Hemorrhage
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Hemodynamic and biochemical changes during normothermic and hypothermic sanguinous perfusion of the porcine hepatic graft. / Ikeda, Tetsuo; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Lebeau, Guy; Higashi, Hidefumi; Kakizoe, Saburo; Starzl, Thomas E.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 50, No. 4, 10.1990, p. 564-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ikeda, Tetsuo ; Yanaga, Katsuhiko ; Lebeau, Guy ; Higashi, Hidefumi ; Kakizoe, Saburo ; Starzl, Thomas E. / Hemodynamic and biochemical changes during normothermic and hypothermic sanguinous perfusion of the porcine hepatic graft. In: Transplantation. 1990 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 564-567.
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