Hepatitis G virus infection in a high-risk subgroup of hospitalized dental patients

Yutaka Takata, Akira Tateishi, Hideo Kurokawa, Megumi Fujikawa, Kiyoshi Matsumura, Masanori Wakisaka, Jinichi Fukuda, Minoru Kajiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The prevalence of hepatitis G virus infection was evaluated in dental patients whose clinical laboratory test results were positive for hepatitis C virus antibody, hepatitis B virus surface antigen, or elevated serum alanine transaminase concentrations. Study design. Frozen serum samples from patients with hepatitis C virus antibody (n = 63), hepatitis B virus surface antigen (n = 20), or alanine transaminase concentrations greater than 100 I∪ (n = 14) were assessed for GB virus C (GBV-C/hepatitis G virus RNA by a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results. Six of 63 patients with hepatitis C virus antibodies had serum hepatitis G virus RNA (9.5%), and 2 of 20 subjects with hepatitis B virus surface antigen had hepatitis G virus RNA (10.0%). None of 14 patients whose alanine transaminase concentration was greater than 100 I∪/L had hepatitis G virus RNA. Of 4 subjects with both hepatitis C virus antibody and hepatitis B virus surface antigen, 2 had hepatitis G virus RNA (50%). In the total study population (N = 92), 6 subjects (6.5%) had hepatitis G virus RNA. All hepatitis G virus-infected patients also had hepatitis C virus antibody. Neither serum alanine transaminase nor aspartate transaminase concentrations were different between subjects with and subjects without hepatitis G virus RNA. The lack of a relationship between hepatitis G virus infection and elevation of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase might suggest that this virus is not truly a hepatitis virus. Conclusions. Hospitalized dental patients are infected with hepatitis G virus at a prevalence similar to or slightly higher than that seen in the general population. Dentists should pay close attention to infection control with respect to the potential new hepatitis virus known as hepatitis G virus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-445
Number of pages4
JournalOral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

GB virus C
Virus Diseases
Tooth
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Alanine Transaminase
RNA
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis Viruses
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Serum
Infection Control
Dentists
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

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Hepatitis G virus infection in a high-risk subgroup of hospitalized dental patients. / Takata, Yutaka; Tateishi, Akira; Kurokawa, Hideo; Fujikawa, Megumi; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Wakisaka, Masanori; Fukuda, Jinichi; Kajiyama, Minoru.

In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, Vol. 87, No. 4, 01.01.1999, p. 442-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takata, Y, Tateishi, A, Kurokawa, H, Fujikawa, M, Matsumura, K, Wakisaka, M, Fukuda, J & Kajiyama, M 1999, 'Hepatitis G virus infection in a high-risk subgroup of hospitalized dental patients', Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 442-445. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1079-2104(99)70243-X
Takata, Yutaka ; Tateishi, Akira ; Kurokawa, Hideo ; Fujikawa, Megumi ; Matsumura, Kiyoshi ; Wakisaka, Masanori ; Fukuda, Jinichi ; Kajiyama, Minoru. / Hepatitis G virus infection in a high-risk subgroup of hospitalized dental patients. In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics. 1999 ; Vol. 87, No. 4. pp. 442-445.
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abstract = "Objective. The prevalence of hepatitis G virus infection was evaluated in dental patients whose clinical laboratory test results were positive for hepatitis C virus antibody, hepatitis B virus surface antigen, or elevated serum alanine transaminase concentrations. Study design. Frozen serum samples from patients with hepatitis C virus antibody (n = 63), hepatitis B virus surface antigen (n = 20), or alanine transaminase concentrations greater than 100 I∪ (n = 14) were assessed for GB virus C (GBV-C/hepatitis G virus RNA by a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results. Six of 63 patients with hepatitis C virus antibodies had serum hepatitis G virus RNA (9.5{\%}), and 2 of 20 subjects with hepatitis B virus surface antigen had hepatitis G virus RNA (10.0{\%}). None of 14 patients whose alanine transaminase concentration was greater than 100 I∪/L had hepatitis G virus RNA. Of 4 subjects with both hepatitis C virus antibody and hepatitis B virus surface antigen, 2 had hepatitis G virus RNA (50{\%}). In the total study population (N = 92), 6 subjects (6.5{\%}) had hepatitis G virus RNA. All hepatitis G virus-infected patients also had hepatitis C virus antibody. Neither serum alanine transaminase nor aspartate transaminase concentrations were different between subjects with and subjects without hepatitis G virus RNA. The lack of a relationship between hepatitis G virus infection and elevation of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase might suggest that this virus is not truly a hepatitis virus. Conclusions. Hospitalized dental patients are infected with hepatitis G virus at a prevalence similar to or slightly higher than that seen in the general population. Dentists should pay close attention to infection control with respect to the potential new hepatitis virus known as hepatitis G virus.",
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AU - Wakisaka, Masanori

AU - Fukuda, Jinichi

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N2 - Objective. The prevalence of hepatitis G virus infection was evaluated in dental patients whose clinical laboratory test results were positive for hepatitis C virus antibody, hepatitis B virus surface antigen, or elevated serum alanine transaminase concentrations. Study design. Frozen serum samples from patients with hepatitis C virus antibody (n = 63), hepatitis B virus surface antigen (n = 20), or alanine transaminase concentrations greater than 100 I∪ (n = 14) were assessed for GB virus C (GBV-C/hepatitis G virus RNA by a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results. Six of 63 patients with hepatitis C virus antibodies had serum hepatitis G virus RNA (9.5%), and 2 of 20 subjects with hepatitis B virus surface antigen had hepatitis G virus RNA (10.0%). None of 14 patients whose alanine transaminase concentration was greater than 100 I∪/L had hepatitis G virus RNA. Of 4 subjects with both hepatitis C virus antibody and hepatitis B virus surface antigen, 2 had hepatitis G virus RNA (50%). In the total study population (N = 92), 6 subjects (6.5%) had hepatitis G virus RNA. All hepatitis G virus-infected patients also had hepatitis C virus antibody. Neither serum alanine transaminase nor aspartate transaminase concentrations were different between subjects with and subjects without hepatitis G virus RNA. The lack of a relationship between hepatitis G virus infection and elevation of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase might suggest that this virus is not truly a hepatitis virus. Conclusions. Hospitalized dental patients are infected with hepatitis G virus at a prevalence similar to or slightly higher than that seen in the general population. Dentists should pay close attention to infection control with respect to the potential new hepatitis virus known as hepatitis G virus.

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