High b value diffusion-weighted imaging is more sensitive to white matter degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Takashi Yoshiura, Futoshi Mihara, Atsuo Tanaka, Koji Ogomori, Yasumasa Ohyagi, Takayuki Taniwaki, Takeshi Yamada, Takao Yamasaki, Atsushi Ichimiya, Naoko Kinukawa, Yasuo Kuwabara, Hiroshi Honda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    57 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    It has been reported that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can detect white matter degeneration in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We hypothesized that imaging of the slow diffusion component using high b value DWI is more sensitive to AD-related white matter degeneration than is conventional DWI, and therefore we studied the effects of high b value on lesion-to-normal contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Seven AD patients and seven age-matched normal subjects were studied with full-tensor DWI at three different b values (1000, 2000, and 4000 s/mm2) without changing echo time or diffusion time, and the mean diffusivities in the parietal and occipital regions were measured. Statistical analyses revealed that use of higher b values significantly improves both lesion-to-normal contrast and CNR. We concluded that high b value DWI is more sensitive to AD-related white matter degeneration than is conventional DWI.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)413-419
    Number of pages7
    JournalNeuroImage
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2003

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Neurology
    • Cognitive Neuroscience

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