Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels

Kenichi Ohki, Sooyoung Chung, Prakash Kara, Mark Hübener, Tobias Bonhoeffer, R. Clay Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

221 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the visual cortex of higher mammals, neurons are arranged across the cortical surface in an orderly map of preferred stimulus orientations. This map contains 'orientation pinwheels', structures that are arranged like the spokes of a wheel such that orientation changes continuously around a centre. Conventional optical imaging first demonstrated these pinwheels, but the technique lacked the spatial resolution to determine the response properties and arrangement of cells near pinwheel centres. Electrophysiological recordings later demonstrated sharply selective neurons near pinwheel centres, but it remained unclear whether they were arranged randomly or in an orderly fashion. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging in vivo to determine the microstructure of pinwheel centres in cat visual cortex with single-cell resolution. We find that pinwheel centres are highly ordered: neurons selective to different orientations are clearly segregated even in the very centre. Thus, pinwheel centres truly represent singularities in the cortical map. This highly ordered arrangement at the level of single cells suggests great precision in the development of cortical circuits underlying orientation selectivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)925-928
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume442
Issue number7105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 24 2006

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Visual Cortex
Neurons
Optical Imaging
Photons
Mammals
Cats
Calcium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Ohki, K., Chung, S., Kara, P., Hübener, M., Bonhoeffer, T., & Reid, R. C. (2006). Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels. Nature, 442(7105), 925-928. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05019

Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels. / Ohki, Kenichi; Chung, Sooyoung; Kara, Prakash; Hübener, Mark; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Reid, R. Clay.

In: Nature, Vol. 442, No. 7105, 24.08.2006, p. 925-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohki, K, Chung, S, Kara, P, Hübener, M, Bonhoeffer, T & Reid, RC 2006, 'Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels', Nature, vol. 442, no. 7105, pp. 925-928. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05019
Ohki K, Chung S, Kara P, Hübener M, Bonhoeffer T, Reid RC. Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels. Nature. 2006 Aug 24;442(7105):925-928. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05019
Ohki, Kenichi ; Chung, Sooyoung ; Kara, Prakash ; Hübener, Mark ; Bonhoeffer, Tobias ; Reid, R. Clay. / Highly ordered arrangement of single neurons in orientation pinwheels. In: Nature. 2006 ; Vol. 442, No. 7105. pp. 925-928.
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