Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma

Takahiko Naka, Carsten Boltze, Doerthe Kuester, Amir Samii, Christian Herold, Helmut Ostertag, Yukihide Iwamoto, Yoshinao Oda, Masazumi Tsuneyoshi, Albert Roessner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intralesional fibrous septum (IFS), a histologic architecture that is typical of chordoma, consists of proliferating spindle-shaped, fibroblast-like cells with an abundance of collagen fibers. However, the histogenesis of IFS is still controversial. In a series of 122 chordomas, special emphasis was placed on the morphology of host tissues involved in IFS and on a transition between IFS and neighboring tissues. In 23 lesions, IFS was also characterized both histochemically and immunohistochemically. IFS was observed in 79 (64.8%) lesions. Occasionally, IFS contained bone fragments and hyalinized matrix with no lining of osteoblastic cells, suggesting degenerated rather than metaplastic bone tissue. Moreover, IFS occasionally showed a direct transition to host bone trabeculae. Histochemically and immunohistochemically, IFS included calcium deposits positive for Alizarin red S staining and expressed both type I and type III collagen. In extraosseous lesions extending to the adjacent soft tissues, IFS frequently involved muscle fibers or peripheral nerve fibers and displayed a smooth transition to neighboring soft tissues. We believe that IFS is induced by a tumor-host interaction that is based on the host bone trabeculae in intraosseous lesions or on soft tissues in extraosseous lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)443-447
Number of pages5
JournalPathology Research and Practice
Volume201
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 24 2005

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Chordoma
Bone and Bones
Collagen Type III
Collagen Type I
Peripheral Nerves
Nerve Fibers
Collagen
Fibroblasts
Staining and Labeling
Calcium
Muscles
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Naka, T., Boltze, C., Kuester, D., Samii, A., Herold, C., Ostertag, H., ... Roessner, A. (2005). Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma. Pathology Research and Practice, 201(6), 443-447. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2005.05.007

Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma. / Naka, Takahiko; Boltze, Carsten; Kuester, Doerthe; Samii, Amir; Herold, Christian; Ostertag, Helmut; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Roessner, Albert.

In: Pathology Research and Practice, Vol. 201, No. 6, 24.08.2005, p. 443-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Naka, T, Boltze, C, Kuester, D, Samii, A, Herold, C, Ostertag, H, Iwamoto, Y, Oda, Y, Tsuneyoshi, M & Roessner, A 2005, 'Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma', Pathology Research and Practice, vol. 201, no. 6, pp. 443-447. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2005.05.007
Naka T, Boltze C, Kuester D, Samii A, Herold C, Ostertag H et al. Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma. Pathology Research and Practice. 2005 Aug 24;201(6):443-447. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2005.05.007
Naka, Takahiko ; Boltze, Carsten ; Kuester, Doerthe ; Samii, Amir ; Herold, Christian ; Ostertag, Helmut ; Iwamoto, Yukihide ; Oda, Yoshinao ; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi ; Roessner, Albert. / Histogenesis of intralesional fibrous septum in chordoma. In: Pathology Research and Practice. 2005 ; Vol. 201, No. 6. pp. 443-447.
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