HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis. Clinical, neuroimaging and immunogenetic studies

Kenji Yamasaki, Izumi Horiuchi, Motozumi Minohara, Yuji Kawano, Yasumasa Ohyagi, Takeshi Yamada, Futoshi Mihara, Hiroshi Ito, Yasuharu Nishimura, Jun-Ichi Kira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to clarify the relationship between the clinical phenotype and the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) in multiple sclerosis in Asians, 93 Japanese patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis underwent clinical MRI and HLA-DPB1 gene typing studies. According to a neurological examination, 29 patients were classified as opticospinal multiple sclerosis, 17 as spinal multiple sclerosis and 47 as Western type multiple sclerosis showing the involvement of multiple sites in the CNS including either the cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The opticospinal multiple sclerosis showed a significantly higher age of onset, higher expanded disability status scale scores and higher CSF cell counts and protein content than the Western type multiple sclerosis. On brain and spinal cord MRI, the opticospinal multiple sclerosis showed a significantly lower number of brain lesions, but a higher frequency of gadolinium-enhancement of the optic nerve and a higher frequency of spinal cord atrophy than in Western type multiple sclerosis. The frequency of the HLA-DPB1*0501 allele was found to be significantly greater in opticospinal multiple sclerosis (93%) than in healthy controls (63%, corrected P value = 0.0091 and relative risk = 7.9), but not in Western type multiple sclerosis (66%) or spinal multiple sclerosis (82%). The marked differences in the clinical and MRI findings as well as in the immunogenetic backgrounds between the opticospinal multiple sclerosis and Western-type multiple sclerosis together suggest that HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis is a distinct subtype of multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1689-1696
Number of pages8
JournalBrain
Volume122
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1999

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Immunogenetics
HLA Antigens
Neuroimaging
Multiple Sclerosis
Spinal Cord
Opticospinal Multiple Sclerosis
Neurologic Examination
Gadolinium
Brain
Cerebrum
Optic Nerve
Age of Onset
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Atrophy
Cell Count
Alleles
Phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

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HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis. Clinical, neuroimaging and immunogenetic studies. / Yamasaki, Kenji; Horiuchi, Izumi; Minohara, Motozumi; Kawano, Yuji; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Yamada, Takeshi; Mihara, Futoshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Kira, Jun-Ichi.

In: Brain, Vol. 122, No. 9, 01.01.1999, p. 1689-1696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamasaki, K, Horiuchi, I, Minohara, M, Kawano, Y, Ohyagi, Y, Yamada, T, Mihara, F, Ito, H, Nishimura, Y & Kira, J-I 1999, 'HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis. Clinical, neuroimaging and immunogenetic studies', Brain, vol. 122, no. 9, pp. 1689-1696. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.9.1689
Yamasaki K, Horiuchi I, Minohara M, Kawano Y, Ohyagi Y, Yamada T et al. HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis. Clinical, neuroimaging and immunogenetic studies. Brain. 1999 Jan 1;122(9):1689-1696. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.9.1689
Yamasaki, Kenji ; Horiuchi, Izumi ; Minohara, Motozumi ; Kawano, Yuji ; Ohyagi, Yasumasa ; Yamada, Takeshi ; Mihara, Futoshi ; Ito, Hiroshi ; Nishimura, Yasuharu ; Kira, Jun-Ichi. / HLA-DPB1*0501-associated opticospinal multiple sclerosis. Clinical, neuroimaging and immunogenetic studies. In: Brain. 1999 ; Vol. 122, No. 9. pp. 1689-1696.
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