Hof1 and Chs4 Interact via F-BAR Domain and Sel1-like Repeats to Control Extracellular Matrix Deposition during Cytokinesis

Younghoon Oh, Jennifer H. Schreiter, Hiroki Okada, Carsten Wloka, Satoshi Okada, Di Yan, Xudong Duan, Erfei Bi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Localized extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is thought to stabilize the cleavage furrow and maintain cell shape during cytokinesis [1–14]. This remodeling is spatiotemporally coordinated with a cytoskeletal structure pertaining to a kingdom of life, for example the FtsZ ring in bacteria [15], the phragmoplast in plants [16], and the actomyosin ring in fungi and animals [17, 18]. Although the cytoskeletal structures have been analyzed extensively, the mechanisms of ECM remodeling remain poorly understood. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ECM remodeling refers to sequential formations of the primary and secondary septa that are catalyzed by chitin synthase-II (Chs2) and chitin synthase-III (the catalytic subunit Chs3 and its activator Chs4), respectively [18, 19]. Surprisingly, both Chs2 and Chs3 are delivered to the division site at the onset of cytokinesis [6, 20]. What keeps Chs3 inactive until secondary septum formation remains unknown. Here, we show that Hof1 binds to the Sel1-like repeats (SLRs) of Chs4 via its F-BAR domain and inhibits Chs3-mediated chitin synthesis during cytokinesis. In addition, Hof1 is required for rapid accumulation as well as efficient removal of Chs4 at the division site. This study uncovers a mechanism by which Hof1 controls timely activation of Chs3 during cytokinesis and defines a novel interaction and function for the conserved F-BAR domain and SLR that are otherwise known for their abilities to bind membrane lipids [21, 22] and scaffold protein complex formation [23]. ECM remodeling during cytokinesis occurs in a spatiotemporally controlled manner. Oh et al. report that the F-BAR protein Hof1 interacts with the SLR protein Chs4 to ensure that secondary septum formation occurs after actomyosin ring constriction and primary septum formation during cytokinesis in budding yeast.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2878-2886.e5
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume27
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 25 2017

Fingerprint

Cytokinesis
cytokinesis
extracellular matrix
Extracellular Matrix
Chitin Synthase
Yeast
Actomyosin
chitin synthase
Saccharomycetales
Proteins
Chitin
Membrane Lipids
Fungi
Scaffolds
scaffolding proteins
yeasts
Bacteria
Animals
Cell Shape
Chemical activation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Hof1 and Chs4 Interact via F-BAR Domain and Sel1-like Repeats to Control Extracellular Matrix Deposition during Cytokinesis. / Oh, Younghoon; Schreiter, Jennifer H.; Okada, Hiroki; Wloka, Carsten; Okada, Satoshi; Yan, Di; Duan, Xudong; Bi, Erfei.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 27, No. 18, 25.09.2017, p. 2878-2886.e5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oh, Younghoon ; Schreiter, Jennifer H. ; Okada, Hiroki ; Wloka, Carsten ; Okada, Satoshi ; Yan, Di ; Duan, Xudong ; Bi, Erfei. / Hof1 and Chs4 Interact via F-BAR Domain and Sel1-like Repeats to Control Extracellular Matrix Deposition during Cytokinesis. In: Current Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 18. pp. 2878-2886.e5.
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