Horse domestication and conservation genetics of Przewalski's horse inferred from sex chromosomal and autosomal sequences

Allison N. Lau, Lei Peng, Hiroki Goto, Leona Chemnick, Oliver A. Ryder, Kateryna D. Makova

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite their ability to interbreed and produce fertile offspring, there is continued disagreement about the genetic relationship of the domestic horse (Equus caballus) to its endangered wild relative, Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalskii). Analyses have differed as to whether or not Przewalski's horse is placed phylogenetically as a separate sister group to domestic horses. Because Przewalski's horse and domestic horse are so closely related, genetic data can also be used to infer domestication-specific differences between the two. To investigate the genetic relationship of Przewalski's horse to the domestic horse and to address whether evolution of the domestic horse is driven by males or females, five homologous introns (a total of ∼3 kb) were sequenced on the X and Y chromosomes in two Przewalski's horses and three breeds of domestic horses: Arabian horse, Mongolian domestic horse, and Dartmoor pony. Five autosomal introns (a total of ∼6 kb) were sequenced for these horses as well. The sequences of sex chromosomal and autosomal introns were used to determine nucleotide diversity and the forces driving evolution in these species. As a result, X chromosomal and autosomal data do not place Przewalski's horses in a separate clade within phylogenetic trees for horses, suggesting a close relationship between domestic and Przewalski's horses. It was also found that there was a lack of nucleotide diversity on the Y chromosome and higher nucleotide diversity than expected on the X chromosome in domestic horses as compared with the Y chromosome and autosomes. This supports the hypothesis that very few male horses along with numerous female horses founded the various domestic horse breeds. Patterns of nucleotide diversity among different types of chromosomes were distinct for Przewalski's in contrast to domestic horses, supporting unique evolutionary histories of the two species.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)199-208
    Number of pages10
    JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
    Volume26
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

    Fingerprint

    Equus przewalskii
    conservation genetics
    domestication
    germplasm conservation
    horse
    Horses
    horses
    gender
    Y chromosome
    nucleotides
    chromosome
    introns
    Domestication
    Y Chromosome
    X chromosome
    Nucleotides
    genetic relationships
    Introns
    Arabian (horse breed)
    X Chromosome

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
    • Molecular Biology
    • Genetics

    Cite this

    Horse domestication and conservation genetics of Przewalski's horse inferred from sex chromosomal and autosomal sequences. / Lau, Allison N.; Peng, Lei; Goto, Hiroki; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver A.; Makova, Kateryna D.

    In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 199-208.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lau, Allison N. ; Peng, Lei ; Goto, Hiroki ; Chemnick, Leona ; Ryder, Oliver A. ; Makova, Kateryna D. / Horse domestication and conservation genetics of Przewalski's horse inferred from sex chromosomal and autosomal sequences. In: Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2009 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 199-208.
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