How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S.

Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling

Akihiko Shinozaki, Shigehiro Kubota

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

In this study, we analyze the growth trajectory of service exports from developing countries to the U.S. based on the network theory. We first conducted a panel data analysis covering 31 countries from 1999 to 2008, the decade right before the 2008 global financial crisis. The study uses data for each country’s service exports to the U.S., number of H-1B visa holders, GNI per-capita, network readiness index, and English proficiency factors. We then use graphical modeling analysis to illustrate the trajectory and interaction among these factors. The analyses yield two observations. First, per-capita income and H-1B visa holders have the most direct effect on service exports to the U.S. Second, the lower a country’s income level is, the more intensively cross-border personal
networks are fabricated through H-1B visas. The results of this study suggest that international human resource networks were a catalyst for low-income economies such as India to expand service exports to the U.S., although service trade is traditionally the domain of high-income countries.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationFukuoka, JAPAN
PublisherSystem LSI Research Center
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
Volume12, No. 1
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016

Publication series

NameSLRC Discussion Paper Series
PublisherSystem LSI Research Center, Kyushu University
No.1
Volume12

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Low-income countries
Modeling
Panel data analysis
Trajectory
Factors
Income level
Income
Network theory
Direct effect
India
Global financial crisis
Human resources
Cross-border
Services trade
Per capita income
Developing countries
Readiness
Interaction
Low income
Catalyst

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

Shinozaki, A., & Kubota, S. (2016). How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S. Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling. (pp. 1-17). (SLRC Discussion Paper Series; Vol. 12, No. 1). Fukuoka, JAPAN: System LSI Research Center.

How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S. Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling. / Shinozaki, Akihiko; Kubota, Shigehiro.

Fukuoka, JAPAN : System LSI Research Center, 2016. p. 1-17 (SLRC Discussion Paper Series; Vol. 12, No. 1).

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Shinozaki, A & Kubota, S 2016 'How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S. Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling' SLRC Discussion Paper Series, no. 1, vol. 12, System LSI Research Center, Fukuoka, JAPAN, pp. 1-17.
Shinozaki A, Kubota S. How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S. Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling. Fukuoka, JAPAN: System LSI Research Center. 2016 Sep, p. 1-17. (SLRC Discussion Paper Series; 1).
Shinozaki, Akihiko ; Kubota, Shigehiro. / How Low Income Countries Can Develop Service Exports to the U.S. Evidence from Panel Data Analysis and Graphical Modeling. Fukuoka, JAPAN : System LSI Research Center, 2016. pp. 1-17 (SLRC Discussion Paper Series; 1).
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