How many trials do we need for reliable NISQ computing?

Teruo Tanimoto, Shuhei Matsuo, Satoshi Kawakami, Yutaka Tabuchi, Masao Hirokawa, Koji Inoue

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Gate-based quantum computing is an attractive candidate in the post-Moore era. Noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) computers are expected to be available in the next few years. It is required to repeatedly execute the target quantum application for reliable NISQ computing, e.g., users can set 1,024 as a repetition parameter in the IBM-Q machine, because NISQ computers output follows the probability distribution of execution trials. Since the distribution depends strongly on the effects of noise, it is difficult to determine a sufficient number of repetitions. This paper proposes a novel statistical approach for efficient NISQ computing. The key idea is to introduce a Bayesian credible interval model to obtain convergence of the probability distributions. We demonstrate that our execution method can detect all significant output values, that occur more often than the random situation (probability is 1/2n), using a NISQ simulator.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2020 IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI, ISVLSI 2020
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages288-290
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781728157757
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020
Event19th IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI, ISVLSI 2020 - Limassol, Cyprus
Duration: Jul 6 2020Jul 8 2020

Publication series

NameProceedings of IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI, ISVLSI
Volume2020-July
ISSN (Print)2159-3469
ISSN (Electronic)2159-3477

Conference

Conference19th IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI, ISVLSI 2020
CountryCyprus
CityLimassol
Period7/6/207/8/20

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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