How much time is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of permanent complete cervical spinal cord injury?

Osamu Kawano, Takeshi Maeda, Eiji Mori, Tsuneaki Takao, Hiroaki Sakai, Muneaki Masuda, Yuichiro Morishita, Tetsuo Hayashi, Kensuke Kubota, Kazu Kobayakawa, Hironari Kaneyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study design: Retrospective chart audits. Objective: To investigate the optimal timing at which permanent complete cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) can be confirmed when evaluating paralysis caused by traumatic CSCI. Setting: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Spinal Injuries Center, Japan. Methods: Two-hundred and three patients with CSCI that was classified with an American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A (AIS A) within 72 h of the initial diagnosis of traumatic CSCI were included in the present study. Neurological data from the time of the initial diagnosis to 1 year after the injury were extracted. The number of those with recovery from AIS A and changes of AIS in the recovery were examined. Results: Thirty-five of 203 (17%) patients whose injuries were initially classified with an AIS A showed recovery from AIS A. Thirty-four of 35 (97%) patients showed recovery from AIS A within 8 weeks after injury. Conclusion: If CSCI patients with AIS A have not recovered by 8 weeks, the likelihood that they will recover from AIS A is marginal. However, this conversely means that we must consider the possibility that a patient with a traumatic CSCI classified with an AIS A may still show recovery from AIS A within the first 8 weeks after injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-289
Number of pages6
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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