Human serum opsonization of orthopedic biomaterial particles: Protein-binding and monocyte/macrophage activation in vitro

Doo Hoon Sun, Michael C.D. Trindade, Yasuharu Nakashima, William J. Maloney, Stuart B. Goodman, David J. Schurman, R. Lane Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wear particles generated after total joint arthroplasty activate monocyte/macrophages and incite formation of a granulomatous periprosthetic tissue associated with bone loss and implant loosening. This study tested the hypothesis that selective opsonization of orthopedic implant biomaterial wear particles by human serum proteins influences monocyte/macrophage activation. Serum protein binding to metallic, polymeric, and ceramic particles was determined by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Individual proteins bound to particles were subsequently identified using two-dimensional SDS-PAGE, microsequencing techniques, and SWISS-PROT analysis. Effects of selective protein opsonization on particle-induced monocyte/macrophage activation were assessed by quantification of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release. Results from one-dimensional gel analyses revealed distinct serum protein-binding patterns specific for each material tested. Two-dimensional gel analysis together with amino acid sequencing of the prominent protein species confirmed the presence of albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin bound to all particles tested. In contrast to the metallic particles, apolipoprotein was a major species associated with polymeric particles. Opsonization of PMMA particles with purified preparations of each of the identified proteins showed that albumin significantly enhanced particle-induced monocyte/macrophage activation. These data confirm orthopedic biomaterial specific binding of human serum proteins and demonstrate that albumin exacerbates particle-induced monocyte/macrophage activation. Alterations in the chemical and surface properties of orthopedic biomaterials to modulate protein interactions may improve implant longevity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-298
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Macrophages
Orthopedics
Biocompatible Materials
Biomaterials
Chemical activation
Proteins
Blood Proteins
Gels
Electrophoresis
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Albumins
Sodium dodecyl sulfate
Wear of materials
Polyacrylates
Arthroplasty
alpha 1-Antitrypsin
Apolipoproteins
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Interleukin-1beta
Chemical properties

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Human serum opsonization of orthopedic biomaterial particles : Protein-binding and monocyte/macrophage activation in vitro. / Sun, Doo Hoon; Trindade, Michael C.D.; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Schurman, David J.; Smith, R. Lane.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 65, No. 2, 01.05.2003, p. 290-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Doo Hoon ; Trindade, Michael C.D. ; Nakashima, Yasuharu ; Maloney, William J. ; Goodman, Stuart B. ; Schurman, David J. ; Smith, R. Lane. / Human serum opsonization of orthopedic biomaterial particles : Protein-binding and monocyte/macrophage activation in vitro. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2003 ; Vol. 65, No. 2. pp. 290-298.
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