Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel

M. Dadfarnia, Petros Athanasios Sofronis, B. P. Somerday, I. M. Robertson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The technology of large scale hydrogen transmission from central production facilities to refueling stations and stationary power sites is at present undeveloped. Among the problems which confront the implementation of this technology is the deleterious effect of hydrogen on structural material properties, in particular at gas pressure of 15 MPa which is the desirable transmission pressure suggested by economic studies for efficient transport. To investigate the hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines, a hydrogen transport methodology for the calculation of hydrogen accumulation ahead of a crack tip in a pipeline steel is outlined. This work addresses the interaction of hydrogen with an axial crack on the inside surface of the pipe. The approach accounts for stress-driven transient diffusion of hydrogen and trapping at microstructural defects whose density evolves dynamically with deformation. The results address the effect of hydrostatic constraint, stress, and plastic strain on the time it takes for the steady state hydrogen profiles to be established.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume
PublisherAmerican Society for Testing and Materials
Pages474-495
Number of pages22
Volume1508 STP
ISBN (Print)9780803134164
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event36th ASTM National Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics - Tampa, FL, United States
Duration: Nov 14 2007Nov 16 2007

Other

Other36th ASTM National Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics
CountryUnited States
CityTampa, FL
Period11/14/0711/16/07

Fingerprint

Steel
Plasticity
Hydrogen
Pipelines
Cracks
Hydrogen embrittlement
Defect density
Crack tips
Plastic deformation
Materials properties
Gases
Pipe
Economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Dadfarnia, M., Sofronis, P. A., Somerday, B. P., & Robertson, I. M. (2009). Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel. In Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume (Vol. 1508 STP, pp. 474-495). American Society for Testing and Materials.

Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel. / Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios; Somerday, B. P.; Robertson, I. M.

Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume. Vol. 1508 STP American Society for Testing and Materials, 2009. p. 474-495.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dadfarnia, M, Sofronis, PA, Somerday, BP & Robertson, IM 2009, Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel. in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume. vol. 1508 STP, American Society for Testing and Materials, pp. 474-495, 36th ASTM National Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics, Tampa, FL, United States, 11/14/07.
Dadfarnia M, Sofronis PA, Somerday BP, Robertson IM. Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel. In Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume. Vol. 1508 STP. American Society for Testing and Materials. 2009. p. 474-495
Dadfarnia, M. ; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios ; Somerday, B. P. ; Robertson, I. M. / Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel. Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume. Vol. 1508 STP American Society for Testing and Materials, 2009. pp. 474-495
@inproceedings{209aa7c133d64c6aaed6aa1c480916ed,
title = "Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel",
abstract = "The technology of large scale hydrogen transmission from central production facilities to refueling stations and stationary power sites is at present undeveloped. Among the problems which confront the implementation of this technology is the deleterious effect of hydrogen on structural material properties, in particular at gas pressure of 15 MPa which is the desirable transmission pressure suggested by economic studies for efficient transport. To investigate the hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines, a hydrogen transport methodology for the calculation of hydrogen accumulation ahead of a crack tip in a pipeline steel is outlined. This work addresses the interaction of hydrogen with an axial crack on the inside surface of the pipe. The approach accounts for stress-driven transient diffusion of hydrogen and trapping at microstructural defects whose density evolves dynamically with deformation. The results address the effect of hydrostatic constraint, stress, and plastic strain on the time it takes for the steady state hydrogen profiles to be established.",
author = "M. Dadfarnia and Sofronis, {Petros Athanasios} and Somerday, {B. P.} and Robertson, {I. M.}",
year = "2009",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780803134164",
volume = "1508 STP",
pages = "474--495",
booktitle = "Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume",
publisher = "American Society for Testing and Materials",
address = "United States",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Hydrogen/plasticity interactions at an axial crack in pipeline steel

AU - Dadfarnia, M.

AU - Sofronis, Petros Athanasios

AU - Somerday, B. P.

AU - Robertson, I. M.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - The technology of large scale hydrogen transmission from central production facilities to refueling stations and stationary power sites is at present undeveloped. Among the problems which confront the implementation of this technology is the deleterious effect of hydrogen on structural material properties, in particular at gas pressure of 15 MPa which is the desirable transmission pressure suggested by economic studies for efficient transport. To investigate the hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines, a hydrogen transport methodology for the calculation of hydrogen accumulation ahead of a crack tip in a pipeline steel is outlined. This work addresses the interaction of hydrogen with an axial crack on the inside surface of the pipe. The approach accounts for stress-driven transient diffusion of hydrogen and trapping at microstructural defects whose density evolves dynamically with deformation. The results address the effect of hydrostatic constraint, stress, and plastic strain on the time it takes for the steady state hydrogen profiles to be established.

AB - The technology of large scale hydrogen transmission from central production facilities to refueling stations and stationary power sites is at present undeveloped. Among the problems which confront the implementation of this technology is the deleterious effect of hydrogen on structural material properties, in particular at gas pressure of 15 MPa which is the desirable transmission pressure suggested by economic studies for efficient transport. To investigate the hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines, a hydrogen transport methodology for the calculation of hydrogen accumulation ahead of a crack tip in a pipeline steel is outlined. This work addresses the interaction of hydrogen with an axial crack on the inside surface of the pipe. The approach accounts for stress-driven transient diffusion of hydrogen and trapping at microstructural defects whose density evolves dynamically with deformation. The results address the effect of hydrostatic constraint, stress, and plastic strain on the time it takes for the steady state hydrogen profiles to be established.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952311992&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77952311992&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:77952311992

SN - 9780803134164

VL - 1508 STP

SP - 474

EP - 495

BT - Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics: 36th Volume

PB - American Society for Testing and Materials

ER -