Hydrologic and Elastic Properties of CO2 Injected Rock at Various Reservoir Conditions: Insights into Quantitative Monitoring of Injected CO2

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

We calculated CO2 displacements in 3D natural sandstone (digital rock model) under various reservoir conditions using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, and characterized the influence of reservoir conditions upon CO2 - water flow. The results of LB simulations under >50 conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behaviors into typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the CO2 and water (M). In addition, the saturation of CO2 (nonwetting phase) was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. These results demonstrated that CO2 saturation is controlled by Ca and M, and the optimum CO2 saturation scales with Ca and M. When we applied similar analysis to the different type of rock, we found that CO2 saturation and behaviors are significantly different. These important differences could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying CO2 behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (i.e., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach provides useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for effective CO2 storage (e.g., high CO2 saturation). We further calculated seismic velocity of the digital rocks with injected CO2 under various reservoir conditions (e.g., Ca and M) using dynamic wave propagation simulation. By using the relation between seismic velocity and CO2 saturation parameterized by reservoir conditions, we could quantify in situ CO2 saturation in reservoir from monitoring data (seismic velocity).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4047-4055
Number of pages9
JournalEnergy Procedia
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017
Event13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT 2016 - Lausanne, Switzerland
Duration: Nov 14 2016Nov 18 2016

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Rocks
Monitoring
Sandstone
Two phase flow
Wave propagation
Water
Viscosity
Fluids
Geometry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

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title = "Hydrologic and Elastic Properties of CO2 Injected Rock at Various Reservoir Conditions: Insights into Quantitative Monitoring of Injected CO2",
abstract = "We calculated CO2 displacements in 3D natural sandstone (digital rock model) under various reservoir conditions using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, and characterized the influence of reservoir conditions upon CO2 - water flow. The results of LB simulations under >50 conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behaviors into typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the CO2 and water (M). In addition, the saturation of CO2 (nonwetting phase) was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. These results demonstrated that CO2 saturation is controlled by Ca and M, and the optimum CO2 saturation scales with Ca and M. When we applied similar analysis to the different type of rock, we found that CO2 saturation and behaviors are significantly different. These important differences could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying CO2 behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (i.e., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach provides useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for effective CO2 storage (e.g., high CO2 saturation). We further calculated seismic velocity of the digital rocks with injected CO2 under various reservoir conditions (e.g., Ca and M) using dynamic wave propagation simulation. By using the relation between seismic velocity and CO2 saturation parameterized by reservoir conditions, we could quantify in situ CO2 saturation in reservoir from monitoring data (seismic velocity).",
author = "Takeshi Tsuji and Tatsunori Ikeda and Fei Jiang",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.1545",
language = "English",
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T1 - Hydrologic and Elastic Properties of CO2 Injected Rock at Various Reservoir Conditions

T2 - Insights into Quantitative Monitoring of Injected CO2

AU - Tsuji, Takeshi

AU - Ikeda, Tatsunori

AU - Jiang, Fei

PY - 2017/1/1

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N2 - We calculated CO2 displacements in 3D natural sandstone (digital rock model) under various reservoir conditions using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, and characterized the influence of reservoir conditions upon CO2 - water flow. The results of LB simulations under >50 conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behaviors into typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the CO2 and water (M). In addition, the saturation of CO2 (nonwetting phase) was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. These results demonstrated that CO2 saturation is controlled by Ca and M, and the optimum CO2 saturation scales with Ca and M. When we applied similar analysis to the different type of rock, we found that CO2 saturation and behaviors are significantly different. These important differences could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying CO2 behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (i.e., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach provides useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for effective CO2 storage (e.g., high CO2 saturation). We further calculated seismic velocity of the digital rocks with injected CO2 under various reservoir conditions (e.g., Ca and M) using dynamic wave propagation simulation. By using the relation between seismic velocity and CO2 saturation parameterized by reservoir conditions, we could quantify in situ CO2 saturation in reservoir from monitoring data (seismic velocity).

AB - We calculated CO2 displacements in 3D natural sandstone (digital rock model) under various reservoir conditions using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, and characterized the influence of reservoir conditions upon CO2 - water flow. The results of LB simulations under >50 conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behaviors into typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the CO2 and water (M). In addition, the saturation of CO2 (nonwetting phase) was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. These results demonstrated that CO2 saturation is controlled by Ca and M, and the optimum CO2 saturation scales with Ca and M. When we applied similar analysis to the different type of rock, we found that CO2 saturation and behaviors are significantly different. These important differences could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying CO2 behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (i.e., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach provides useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for effective CO2 storage (e.g., high CO2 saturation). We further calculated seismic velocity of the digital rocks with injected CO2 under various reservoir conditions (e.g., Ca and M) using dynamic wave propagation simulation. By using the relation between seismic velocity and CO2 saturation parameterized by reservoir conditions, we could quantify in situ CO2 saturation in reservoir from monitoring data (seismic velocity).

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