Hypotonic stress-induced dual Ca2+ responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells

Masahiro Oike, Chiwaka Kimura, Tetsuya Koyama, Miyuki Yoshikawa, I. T.O. Yushi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We have investigated the effects of hypotonic stress on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)) in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Reducing extracellular osmolarity by 5% to 40% elicited a steep Ca2+ transient both in normal Krebs and Ca2+-free solutions. The hypotonic stress-induced Ca2+ transient was inhibited by phospholipase C inhibitors (neomycin and U-73122), a P2-receptor antagonist (suramin), and an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme (apyrase), suggesting that the hypotonic stress-induced Ca2+ transient is mediated by ATP. A luciferin-luciferase assay confirmed that 40% hypotonic stress released 91.0 amol/cell of ATP in 10 min. When the hypotonic stress-induced fast Ca2+ transient was inhibited by neomycin, suramin, or apyrase, a gradual [Ca2+](i) increase was observed instead. This hypotonic stress-induced gradual [Ca2+](i) increase was inhibited by a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 4-bromophenacyl bromide. Furthermore, exogenously applied arachidonic acid induced a gradual [Ca2+](i) increase with an ED50 of 13.3 μM. These observations indicate that hypotonic stress induces a dual Ca2+ response in bovine aortic endothelial ceils, i.e., an ATP-mediated fast Ca2+ transient and an arachidonic acid-mediated gradual Ca2+ increase, the former being the predominant response in normal conditions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume279
Issue number2 48-2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 14 2000

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Osmotic Pressure
Endothelial Cells
Adenosine Triphosphate
Apyrase
Suramin
Neomycin
Arachidonic Acid
Type C Phospholipases
Luciferases
Osmolar Concentration
Calcium
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Hypotonic stress-induced dual Ca2+ responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. / Oike, Masahiro; Kimura, Chiwaka; Koyama, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Miyuki; Yushi, I. T.O.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 279, No. 2 48-2, 14.09.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oike, Masahiro ; Kimura, Chiwaka ; Koyama, Tetsuya ; Yoshikawa, Miyuki ; Yushi, I. T.O. / Hypotonic stress-induced dual Ca2+ responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 279, No. 2 48-2.
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