Identification of Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli in diarrhoeic calves and comparative genomics of O5 bovine and human STEC

I. Fakih, D. Thiry, J. N. Duprez, M. Saulmont, A. Iguchi, D. Piérard, L. Jouant, G. Daube, Y. Ogura, T. Hayashi, B. Taminiau, J. G. Mainil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Escherichia coli producing Shiga toxins (Stx) and the attaching-effacing (AE) lesion (AE-STEC) are responsible for (bloody) diarrhoea in humans and calves while the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) producing the AE lesion only cause non-bloody diarrhoea in all mammals. The purpose of this study was (i) to identify the pathotypes of enterohaemolysin-producing E. coli isolated between 2009 and 2013 on EHLY agar from less than 2 month-old diarrhoeic calves with a triplex PCR targeting the stx1, stx2, eae virulence genes; (ii) to serotype the positive isolates with PCR targeting the genes coding for ten most frequent and pathogenic human and calf STEC O serogroups; and (iii) to compare the MLSTypes and virulotypes of calf and human O5 AE-STEC after Whole Genome Sequencing using two server databases (www.genomicepidemiology.org). Of 233 isolates, 206 were triplex PCR-positive: 119 AE-STEC (58%), 78 EPEC (38%) and 9 STEC (4%); and the stx1+eae+ AE-STEC (49.5%) were the most frequent. Of them, 120 isolates (84% of AE-STEC, 23% of EPEC, 22% of STEC) tested positive with one O serogroup PCR: 57 for O26 (47.5%), 36 for O111 (30%), 10 for O103 (8%) and 8 for O5 (7%) serogroups. The analysis of the draft sequences of 15 O5 AE-STEC could not identify any difference correlated to the host. As a conclusion, (i) the AE-STEC associated with diarrhoea in young calves still belong to the same serogroups as previously (O5, O26, O111) but the O103 serogroup may be emerging, (ii) the O5 AE-STEC from calves and humans are genetically similar.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume202
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

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Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli
Shiga toxin
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli
enteropathogenic Escherichia coli
Genomics
serotypes
calves
genomics
cattle
diarrhea
lesions (animal)
Diarrhea
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
pathotypes
gene targeting
virulence
agar
mammals
Escherichia coli

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Identification of Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli in diarrhoeic calves and comparative genomics of O5 bovine and human STEC. / Fakih, I.; Thiry, D.; Duprez, J. N.; Saulmont, M.; Iguchi, A.; Piérard, D.; Jouant, L.; Daube, G.; Ogura, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Taminiau, B.; Mainil, J. G.

In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 202, 04.2017, p. 16-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fakih, I. ; Thiry, D. ; Duprez, J. N. ; Saulmont, M. ; Iguchi, A. ; Piérard, D. ; Jouant, L. ; Daube, G. ; Ogura, Y. ; Hayashi, T. ; Taminiau, B. ; Mainil, J. G. / Identification of Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli in diarrhoeic calves and comparative genomics of O5 bovine and human STEC. In: Veterinary Microbiology. 2017 ; Vol. 202. pp. 16-22.
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abstract = "Escherichia coli producing Shiga toxins (Stx) and the attaching-effacing (AE) lesion (AE-STEC) are responsible for (bloody) diarrhoea in humans and calves while the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) producing the AE lesion only cause non-bloody diarrhoea in all mammals. The purpose of this study was (i) to identify the pathotypes of enterohaemolysin-producing E. coli isolated between 2009 and 2013 on EHLY agar from less than 2 month-old diarrhoeic calves with a triplex PCR targeting the stx1, stx2, eae virulence genes; (ii) to serotype the positive isolates with PCR targeting the genes coding for ten most frequent and pathogenic human and calf STEC O serogroups; and (iii) to compare the MLSTypes and virulotypes of calf and human O5 AE-STEC after Whole Genome Sequencing using two server databases (www.genomicepidemiology.org). Of 233 isolates, 206 were triplex PCR-positive: 119 AE-STEC (58{\%}), 78 EPEC (38{\%}) and 9 STEC (4{\%}); and the stx1+eae+ AE-STEC (49.5{\%}) were the most frequent. Of them, 120 isolates (84{\%} of AE-STEC, 23{\%} of EPEC, 22{\%} of STEC) tested positive with one O serogroup PCR: 57 for O26 (47.5{\%}), 36 for O111 (30{\%}), 10 for O103 (8{\%}) and 8 for O5 (7{\%}) serogroups. The analysis of the draft sequences of 15 O5 AE-STEC could not identify any difference correlated to the host. As a conclusion, (i) the AE-STEC associated with diarrhoea in young calves still belong to the same serogroups as previously (O5, O26, O111) but the O103 serogroup may be emerging, (ii) the O5 AE-STEC from calves and humans are genetically similar.",
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AU - Thiry, D.

AU - Duprez, J. N.

AU - Saulmont, M.

AU - Iguchi, A.

AU - Piérard, D.

AU - Jouant, L.

AU - Daube, G.

AU - Ogura, Y.

AU - Hayashi, T.

AU - Taminiau, B.

AU - Mainil, J. G.

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