Identity Development in Relation to Time Beliefs in Emerging Adulthood: A Long-Term Longitudinal Study

Toshiaki Shirai, Tomoyasu Nakamura, Kumiko Katsuma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores how identity development relates to time beliefs in the transition to adulthood. Time belief was evaluated by delay of gratification, unconcern for the future, and present-mindfulness. Longitudinal data (N = 232) were analyzed at ages 24, 27, and 30 using structural equation modeling. Commitment was positively related to delay of gratification and negatively to unconcern for the future, and exploration was positively related to present-mindfulness. These results suggest that a future-oriented attitude, including delay of gratification and concern for the future, as well as openness to experiences provided by present-mindfulness, contribute to the development of identity in the transition to young adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-58
Number of pages14
JournalIdentity
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2 2016

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adulthood
longitudinal study
present
commitment
time
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Identity Development in Relation to Time Beliefs in Emerging Adulthood : A Long-Term Longitudinal Study. / Shirai, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Tomoyasu; Katsuma, Kumiko.

In: Identity, Vol. 16, No. 1, 02.01.2016, p. 45-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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