Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect

Bunichi Hirayama, Takahisa Anada, Yukari Shiwaku, Naohisa Miyatake, Kaori Tsuchiya, Masanori Nakamura, Tetsu Takahashi, Osamu Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate how octacalcium phosphate (OCP) induces an immune response and whether the response is involved in the biodegradation and subsequent bone formation by OCP implantation in bone defects. Tissue and cellular responses to OCP were compared with those to OCP hydrolyzate (referred to as HL hereafter), which is a Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared through OCP hydrolysis, by implanting them in rat tibia defects from 5 days to one month. They were also incubated with the macrophage cell line J774.1 for 3 days in vitro. Immunostaining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and histomorphometric analyses indicated that CD68-positive macrophage-like cells, CXCL2-positive cells and TRAP-positive cells accumulated around OCP to a greater extent than HL. In addition, OCP induced more extensive bone formation compared to HL. OCP also enhanced greater IL-6 production and macrophage migration compared to HL. A physicochemical milieu containing calcium ions, which simulates that induced by OCP, also increased macrophage migration. Together, these results suggest that the stimulatory capacity of OCP to induce bone formation can be explained in part by the immune response moderately induced by OCP, which is related to its physicochemical properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57475-57484
Number of pages10
JournalRSC Advances
Volume6
Issue number62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rats
Bone
Phosphates
Defects
Macrophages
Phosphatases
Cells
Acid Phosphatase
octacalcium phosphate
Acids
Durapatite
Biodegradation
Hydroxyapatite
Calcium
Hydrolysis
Interleukin-6
Ions
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect. / Hirayama, Bunichi; Anada, Takahisa; Shiwaku, Yukari; Miyatake, Naohisa; Tsuchiya, Kaori; Nakamura, Masanori; Takahashi, Tetsu; Suzuki, Osamu.

In: RSC Advances, Vol. 6, No. 62, 01.01.2016, p. 57475-57484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirayama, B, Anada, T, Shiwaku, Y, Miyatake, N, Tsuchiya, K, Nakamura, M, Takahashi, T & Suzuki, O 2016, 'Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect', RSC Advances, vol. 6, no. 62, pp. 57475-57484. https://doi.org/10.1039/c6ra10834b
Hirayama, Bunichi ; Anada, Takahisa ; Shiwaku, Yukari ; Miyatake, Naohisa ; Tsuchiya, Kaori ; Nakamura, Masanori ; Takahashi, Tetsu ; Suzuki, Osamu. / Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect. In: RSC Advances. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 62. pp. 57475-57484.
@article{7692b4f25620440bbbd37c4d5ec70e27,
title = "Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect",
abstract = "The present study was designed to investigate how octacalcium phosphate (OCP) induces an immune response and whether the response is involved in the biodegradation and subsequent bone formation by OCP implantation in bone defects. Tissue and cellular responses to OCP were compared with those to OCP hydrolyzate (referred to as HL hereafter), which is a Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared through OCP hydrolysis, by implanting them in rat tibia defects from 5 days to one month. They were also incubated with the macrophage cell line J774.1 for 3 days in vitro. Immunostaining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and histomorphometric analyses indicated that CD68-positive macrophage-like cells, CXCL2-positive cells and TRAP-positive cells accumulated around OCP to a greater extent than HL. In addition, OCP induced more extensive bone formation compared to HL. OCP also enhanced greater IL-6 production and macrophage migration compared to HL. A physicochemical milieu containing calcium ions, which simulates that induced by OCP, also increased macrophage migration. Together, these results suggest that the stimulatory capacity of OCP to induce bone formation can be explained in part by the immune response moderately induced by OCP, which is related to its physicochemical properties.",
author = "Bunichi Hirayama and Takahisa Anada and Yukari Shiwaku and Naohisa Miyatake and Kaori Tsuchiya and Masanori Nakamura and Tetsu Takahashi and Osamu Suzuki",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1039/c6ra10834b",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "57475--57484",
journal = "RSC Advances",
issn = "2046-2069",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "62",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immune cell response and subsequent bone formation induced by implantation of octacalcium phosphate in a rat tibia defect

AU - Hirayama, Bunichi

AU - Anada, Takahisa

AU - Shiwaku, Yukari

AU - Miyatake, Naohisa

AU - Tsuchiya, Kaori

AU - Nakamura, Masanori

AU - Takahashi, Tetsu

AU - Suzuki, Osamu

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - The present study was designed to investigate how octacalcium phosphate (OCP) induces an immune response and whether the response is involved in the biodegradation and subsequent bone formation by OCP implantation in bone defects. Tissue and cellular responses to OCP were compared with those to OCP hydrolyzate (referred to as HL hereafter), which is a Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared through OCP hydrolysis, by implanting them in rat tibia defects from 5 days to one month. They were also incubated with the macrophage cell line J774.1 for 3 days in vitro. Immunostaining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and histomorphometric analyses indicated that CD68-positive macrophage-like cells, CXCL2-positive cells and TRAP-positive cells accumulated around OCP to a greater extent than HL. In addition, OCP induced more extensive bone formation compared to HL. OCP also enhanced greater IL-6 production and macrophage migration compared to HL. A physicochemical milieu containing calcium ions, which simulates that induced by OCP, also increased macrophage migration. Together, these results suggest that the stimulatory capacity of OCP to induce bone formation can be explained in part by the immune response moderately induced by OCP, which is related to its physicochemical properties.

AB - The present study was designed to investigate how octacalcium phosphate (OCP) induces an immune response and whether the response is involved in the biodegradation and subsequent bone formation by OCP implantation in bone defects. Tissue and cellular responses to OCP were compared with those to OCP hydrolyzate (referred to as HL hereafter), which is a Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared through OCP hydrolysis, by implanting them in rat tibia defects from 5 days to one month. They were also incubated with the macrophage cell line J774.1 for 3 days in vitro. Immunostaining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and histomorphometric analyses indicated that CD68-positive macrophage-like cells, CXCL2-positive cells and TRAP-positive cells accumulated around OCP to a greater extent than HL. In addition, OCP induced more extensive bone formation compared to HL. OCP also enhanced greater IL-6 production and macrophage migration compared to HL. A physicochemical milieu containing calcium ions, which simulates that induced by OCP, also increased macrophage migration. Together, these results suggest that the stimulatory capacity of OCP to induce bone formation can be explained in part by the immune response moderately induced by OCP, which is related to its physicochemical properties.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84976417420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84976417420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c6ra10834b

DO - 10.1039/c6ra10834b

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84976417420

VL - 6

SP - 57475

EP - 57484

JO - RSC Advances

JF - RSC Advances

SN - 2046-2069

IS - 62

ER -