Immunosuppressive mesenchymal stem cells aggregates incorporating hydrogel microspheres promote an in vitro invasion of cancer cells

Teruki Nii, Yasuhiko Tabata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
The objective of this study is to design a co-culture system of cancer cells and three-dimensional (3D) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) aggregates for the in vitro evaluation of cancer invasion.

Methods
First, the MSC of an immunosuppressive phenotype (MSC2) were prepared by the MSC stimulation of polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid. By simple mixing MSC2 and gelatin hydrogel microspheres (GM) in a U-bottomed well of 96 well plates which had been pre-coated with poly (vinyl alcohol), 3D MSC2 aggregates incorporating GM were obtained. The amount of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) secreted from the MSC2 aggregates incorporating GM. Finally, an invasion assay was performed to evaluate the cancer invasion rate by co-cultured cancer cells and the 3D MSC2 incorporating GM.

Results
The amount of CCL5 secreted for the 3D MSC2 aggregates incorporating GM was significantly higher than that of two-dimensional (2D) MSC, 2D MSC2, and 3D MSC aggregates incorporating GM. When MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were co-cultured with the 3D MSC2 aggregates incorporating GM, the invasion rate of cancer cells was significantly high compared with that of 2D MSC or 2D MSC2 and 3D MSC aggregates incorporating GM. In addition, high secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was observed for the 3D MSC2 aggregates/cancer cells system.

Conclusions
It is concluded that the co-culture system of 3D MSC2 aggregates incorporating GM and cancer cells is promising to evaluate the invasion of cancer cells in vitro.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)516-522
Number of pages7
JournalRegenerative Therapy
Volume18
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

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