Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on working students: Results from the Labour Force Survey and the student lifestyle survey

Shinobu Tsurugano, Mariko Nishikitani, Mariko Inoue, Eiji Yano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused devastating damage to employment globally, particularly among the non-standard workforce. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of the pandemic on the employment status and lives of working students in Japan. Methods: The Labour Force Survey (January 2019 to May 2020) was used to examine changes in students’ work situations. In addition, to investigate the economic and health conditions of university students during the pandemic, the Student Lifestyle Survey was conducted in late May 2020. This survey asked students at a national university in Tokyo about recent changes in their studies, work, and lives. Results: The number of working students reported in the Labour Force Survey has declined sharply since March 2020, falling by 780,000 (46%) in April. According to a survey of university students’ living conditions, 37% were concerned about living expenses and tuition fees, and a higher percentage of students who were aware of financial insecurity had poor self-rated health. Conclusion: Nearly half of working students have lost their jobs during the pandemic in Japan, which has affected their lives, studies, and health. There is a need to monitor the impact of economic insecurity on students’ studies and health over time, and to expand the safety net for disadvantaged students.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12209
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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