Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model

Michele Diana, Eric Noll, Andras Legnèr, Seong Ho Kong, Yu Yin Liu, Luigi Schiraldi, Francesco Marchegiani, Jordan Bano, Bernard Geny, Anne Laure Charles, Bernard Dallemagne, Véronique Lindner, Didier Mutter, Pierre Diemunsch, Jacques Marescaux

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Abstract

Background: Standard insufflators compensate for intra-abdominal pressure variations with pressure spikes. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a stable, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum induced by a valve-less insufflator, on working space, hemodynamics, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology, in a model of laparoscopic sigmoid resection. Materials and methods: Twelve pigs (47 ± 3.3 kg) were equipped for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and randomly assigned to Standard (n = 6) vs. valve-less (n = 6) insufflation. Animals were positioned in a 30° Trendelenburg on a CT scan bed. A low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was started and duration was set for 180 min. Abdominal CT scans were performed, under neuromuscular blockade, before, immediately after, and 1 and 3 h after insufflation. Pneumoperitoneum volumes were calculated on 3D reconstructed CT scans. After creation of a mesenteric window, capillary blood was obtained by puncturing the sigmoid serosa and local lactatemia (mmol/L) was measured using a handheld analyzer. Surgical resection was performed according to the level of lactates, in order to standardize bowel stump perfusion. IL-1 and IL-6 (ng/mL) were measured repeatedly. The peritoneum was sampled close to the surgical site and distantly for the oxygraphic assessment of mitochondrial respiration. A pathologist applied a semi-quantitative score to evaluate the anastomosis. Results: Mean arterial pressure, pulse, body temperature, oximetry, systemic lactatemia, and local lactates were similar. IL-6 was lower in the valve-less group, reaching a statistically significant difference after 3 h of insufflation (64.85 ± 32.5 vs. 133.95 ± 59.73; p = 0.038) and 48 h (77.53 ± 68.4 vs. 190.74 ± 140.79; p = 0.029). Peritoneal mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased after the survival period, with no difference among the groups. The anastomoses in the valve-less group demonstrated a lower acute (p = 0.04) inflammatory infiltration. The mean anterior posterior thickness was slightly, yet significantly higher in the valve-less group, on all post-insufflation CT scans. Conclusions: Valve-less insufflation achieved a slightly higher working space and a lower systemic and localized inflammatory response in this experimental setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3215-3224
Number of pages10
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2018

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Insufflation
Pneumoperitoneum
Sigmoid Colon
Theoretical Models
Inflammation
Lactates
Pressure
Interleukin-6
Respiration
Hemodynamics
Serous Membrane
Neuromuscular Blockade
Oximetry
Peritoneum
Body Temperature
Interleukin-1
Pulse
Arterial Pressure
Swine
Perfusion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model. / Diana, Michele; Noll, Eric; Legnèr, Andras; Kong, Seong Ho; Liu, Yu Yin; Schiraldi, Luigi; Marchegiani, Francesco; Bano, Jordan; Geny, Bernard; Charles, Anne Laure; Dallemagne, Bernard; Lindner, Véronique; Mutter, Didier; Diemunsch, Pierre; Marescaux, Jacques.

In: Surgical endoscopy, Vol. 32, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 3215-3224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diana, M, Noll, E, Legnèr, A, Kong, SH, Liu, YY, Schiraldi, L, Marchegiani, F, Bano, J, Geny, B, Charles, AL, Dallemagne, B, Lindner, V, Mutter, D, Diemunsch, P & Marescaux, J 2018, 'Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model', Surgical endoscopy, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 3215-3224. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-018-6039-x
Diana, Michele ; Noll, Eric ; Legnèr, Andras ; Kong, Seong Ho ; Liu, Yu Yin ; Schiraldi, Luigi ; Marchegiani, Francesco ; Bano, Jordan ; Geny, Bernard ; Charles, Anne Laure ; Dallemagne, Bernard ; Lindner, Véronique ; Mutter, Didier ; Diemunsch, Pierre ; Marescaux, Jacques. / Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model. In: Surgical endoscopy. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 3215-3224.
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abstract = "Background: Standard insufflators compensate for intra-abdominal pressure variations with pressure spikes. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a stable, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum induced by a valve-less insufflator, on working space, hemodynamics, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology, in a model of laparoscopic sigmoid resection. Materials and methods: Twelve pigs (47 ± 3.3 kg) were equipped for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and randomly assigned to Standard (n = 6) vs. valve-less (n = 6) insufflation. Animals were positioned in a 30° Trendelenburg on a CT scan bed. A low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was started and duration was set for 180 min. Abdominal CT scans were performed, under neuromuscular blockade, before, immediately after, and 1 and 3 h after insufflation. Pneumoperitoneum volumes were calculated on 3D reconstructed CT scans. After creation of a mesenteric window, capillary blood was obtained by puncturing the sigmoid serosa and local lactatemia (mmol/L) was measured using a handheld analyzer. Surgical resection was performed according to the level of lactates, in order to standardize bowel stump perfusion. IL-1 and IL-6 (ng/mL) were measured repeatedly. The peritoneum was sampled close to the surgical site and distantly for the oxygraphic assessment of mitochondrial respiration. A pathologist applied a semi-quantitative score to evaluate the anastomosis. Results: Mean arterial pressure, pulse, body temperature, oximetry, systemic lactatemia, and local lactates were similar. IL-6 was lower in the valve-less group, reaching a statistically significant difference after 3 h of insufflation (64.85 ± 32.5 vs. 133.95 ± 59.73; p = 0.038) and 48 h (77.53 ± 68.4 vs. 190.74 ± 140.79; p = 0.029). Peritoneal mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased after the survival period, with no difference among the groups. The anastomoses in the valve-less group demonstrated a lower acute (p = 0.04) inflammatory infiltration. The mean anterior posterior thickness was slightly, yet significantly higher in the valve-less group, on all post-insufflation CT scans. Conclusions: Valve-less insufflation achieved a slightly higher working space and a lower systemic and localized inflammatory response in this experimental setting.",
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T1 - Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model

AU - Diana, Michele

AU - Noll, Eric

AU - Legnèr, Andras

AU - Kong, Seong Ho

AU - Liu, Yu Yin

AU - Schiraldi, Luigi

AU - Marchegiani, Francesco

AU - Bano, Jordan

AU - Geny, Bernard

AU - Charles, Anne Laure

AU - Dallemagne, Bernard

AU - Lindner, Véronique

AU - Mutter, Didier

AU - Diemunsch, Pierre

AU - Marescaux, Jacques

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Background: Standard insufflators compensate for intra-abdominal pressure variations with pressure spikes. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a stable, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum induced by a valve-less insufflator, on working space, hemodynamics, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology, in a model of laparoscopic sigmoid resection. Materials and methods: Twelve pigs (47 ± 3.3 kg) were equipped for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and randomly assigned to Standard (n = 6) vs. valve-less (n = 6) insufflation. Animals were positioned in a 30° Trendelenburg on a CT scan bed. A low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was started and duration was set for 180 min. Abdominal CT scans were performed, under neuromuscular blockade, before, immediately after, and 1 and 3 h after insufflation. Pneumoperitoneum volumes were calculated on 3D reconstructed CT scans. After creation of a mesenteric window, capillary blood was obtained by puncturing the sigmoid serosa and local lactatemia (mmol/L) was measured using a handheld analyzer. Surgical resection was performed according to the level of lactates, in order to standardize bowel stump perfusion. IL-1 and IL-6 (ng/mL) were measured repeatedly. The peritoneum was sampled close to the surgical site and distantly for the oxygraphic assessment of mitochondrial respiration. A pathologist applied a semi-quantitative score to evaluate the anastomosis. Results: Mean arterial pressure, pulse, body temperature, oximetry, systemic lactatemia, and local lactates were similar. IL-6 was lower in the valve-less group, reaching a statistically significant difference after 3 h of insufflation (64.85 ± 32.5 vs. 133.95 ± 59.73; p = 0.038) and 48 h (77.53 ± 68.4 vs. 190.74 ± 140.79; p = 0.029). Peritoneal mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased after the survival period, with no difference among the groups. The anastomoses in the valve-less group demonstrated a lower acute (p = 0.04) inflammatory infiltration. The mean anterior posterior thickness was slightly, yet significantly higher in the valve-less group, on all post-insufflation CT scans. Conclusions: Valve-less insufflation achieved a slightly higher working space and a lower systemic and localized inflammatory response in this experimental setting.

AB - Background: Standard insufflators compensate for intra-abdominal pressure variations with pressure spikes. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a stable, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum induced by a valve-less insufflator, on working space, hemodynamics, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology, in a model of laparoscopic sigmoid resection. Materials and methods: Twelve pigs (47 ± 3.3 kg) were equipped for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and randomly assigned to Standard (n = 6) vs. valve-less (n = 6) insufflation. Animals were positioned in a 30° Trendelenburg on a CT scan bed. A low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was started and duration was set for 180 min. Abdominal CT scans were performed, under neuromuscular blockade, before, immediately after, and 1 and 3 h after insufflation. Pneumoperitoneum volumes were calculated on 3D reconstructed CT scans. After creation of a mesenteric window, capillary blood was obtained by puncturing the sigmoid serosa and local lactatemia (mmol/L) was measured using a handheld analyzer. Surgical resection was performed according to the level of lactates, in order to standardize bowel stump perfusion. IL-1 and IL-6 (ng/mL) were measured repeatedly. The peritoneum was sampled close to the surgical site and distantly for the oxygraphic assessment of mitochondrial respiration. A pathologist applied a semi-quantitative score to evaluate the anastomosis. Results: Mean arterial pressure, pulse, body temperature, oximetry, systemic lactatemia, and local lactates were similar. IL-6 was lower in the valve-less group, reaching a statistically significant difference after 3 h of insufflation (64.85 ± 32.5 vs. 133.95 ± 59.73; p = 0.038) and 48 h (77.53 ± 68.4 vs. 190.74 ± 140.79; p = 0.029). Peritoneal mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased after the survival period, with no difference among the groups. The anastomoses in the valve-less group demonstrated a lower acute (p = 0.04) inflammatory infiltration. The mean anterior posterior thickness was slightly, yet significantly higher in the valve-less group, on all post-insufflation CT scans. Conclusions: Valve-less insufflation achieved a slightly higher working space and a lower systemic and localized inflammatory response in this experimental setting.

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