Improved contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs by IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with electrical pulse stimulation

Kazushi Ikeda, Akira Ito, Masanori Sato, Yoshinori Kawabe, Masamichi Kamihira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should be designed to generate contractile force with directional movement. Because electrical impulses from a somatic nervous system are crucial for in vivo skeletal muscle development, electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) culture as an artificial exercise is essential to fabricate functional skeletal muscle tissues in vitro. To further improve muscle functions, the activation of cell-signaling pathways from myogenic growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, is also important. Because tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should maintain a high cell-dense structure, the expression of an anti-apoptotic factor, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), could be effective in preventing cell death. Methods: In the present study, myoblasts were genetically modified with inducible expression units of IGF-I and Bcl-2 genes, and the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs fabricated from the myoblasts were cultured under continuous EPS. Results: Overexpression of IGF-I gene induced muscular hypertrophy in the muscle tissue constructs, and Bcl-2-overexpressing myoblasts formed significantly cell-dense and viable muscle tissue constructs. Furthermore, the combination of IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with EPS culture highly improved the force generation of the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Conclusions: This approach has the potential to yield functional skeletal muscle substitutes with high force generation ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalRegenerative Therapy
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Gene transfer
Insulin
B-Cell Lymphoma
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Electric Stimulation
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Tissue
Myoblasts
Genes
Muscles
Muscle Development
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Cell signaling
Hypertrophy
Nervous System
Cell Death
Neurology
Cell death
Chemical activation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

@article{ed5706e43e934608a8f2d166a4e9a6cd,
title = "Improved contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs by IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with electrical pulse stimulation",
abstract = "Introduction: Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should be designed to generate contractile force with directional movement. Because electrical impulses from a somatic nervous system are crucial for in vivo skeletal muscle development, electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) culture as an artificial exercise is essential to fabricate functional skeletal muscle tissues in vitro. To further improve muscle functions, the activation of cell-signaling pathways from myogenic growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, is also important. Because tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should maintain a high cell-dense structure, the expression of an anti-apoptotic factor, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), could be effective in preventing cell death. Methods: In the present study, myoblasts were genetically modified with inducible expression units of IGF-I and Bcl-2 genes, and the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs fabricated from the myoblasts were cultured under continuous EPS. Results: Overexpression of IGF-I gene induced muscular hypertrophy in the muscle tissue constructs, and Bcl-2-overexpressing myoblasts formed significantly cell-dense and viable muscle tissue constructs. Furthermore, the combination of IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with EPS culture highly improved the force generation of the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Conclusions: This approach has the potential to yield functional skeletal muscle substitutes with high force generation ability.",
author = "Kazushi Ikeda and Akira Ito and Masanori Sato and Yoshinori Kawabe and Masamichi Kamihira",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.reth.2015.12.004",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "38--44",
journal = "Regenerative Therapy",
issn = "2352-3204",
publisher = "Japanese Society of Regenerative Medicine",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improved contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs by IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with electrical pulse stimulation

AU - Ikeda, Kazushi

AU - Ito, Akira

AU - Sato, Masanori

AU - Kawabe, Yoshinori

AU - Kamihira, Masamichi

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Introduction: Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should be designed to generate contractile force with directional movement. Because electrical impulses from a somatic nervous system are crucial for in vivo skeletal muscle development, electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) culture as an artificial exercise is essential to fabricate functional skeletal muscle tissues in vitro. To further improve muscle functions, the activation of cell-signaling pathways from myogenic growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, is also important. Because tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should maintain a high cell-dense structure, the expression of an anti-apoptotic factor, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), could be effective in preventing cell death. Methods: In the present study, myoblasts were genetically modified with inducible expression units of IGF-I and Bcl-2 genes, and the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs fabricated from the myoblasts were cultured under continuous EPS. Results: Overexpression of IGF-I gene induced muscular hypertrophy in the muscle tissue constructs, and Bcl-2-overexpressing myoblasts formed significantly cell-dense and viable muscle tissue constructs. Furthermore, the combination of IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with EPS culture highly improved the force generation of the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Conclusions: This approach has the potential to yield functional skeletal muscle substitutes with high force generation ability.

AB - Introduction: Tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should be designed to generate contractile force with directional movement. Because electrical impulses from a somatic nervous system are crucial for in vivo skeletal muscle development, electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) culture as an artificial exercise is essential to fabricate functional skeletal muscle tissues in vitro. To further improve muscle functions, the activation of cell-signaling pathways from myogenic growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, is also important. Because tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs should maintain a high cell-dense structure, the expression of an anti-apoptotic factor, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), could be effective in preventing cell death. Methods: In the present study, myoblasts were genetically modified with inducible expression units of IGF-I and Bcl-2 genes, and the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs fabricated from the myoblasts were cultured under continuous EPS. Results: Overexpression of IGF-I gene induced muscular hypertrophy in the muscle tissue constructs, and Bcl-2-overexpressing myoblasts formed significantly cell-dense and viable muscle tissue constructs. Furthermore, the combination of IGF-I and Bcl-2 gene transfer with EPS culture highly improved the force generation of the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Conclusions: This approach has the potential to yield functional skeletal muscle substitutes with high force generation ability.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041049574&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041049574&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.reth.2015.12.004

DO - 10.1016/j.reth.2015.12.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85041049574

VL - 3

SP - 38

EP - 44

JO - Regenerative Therapy

JF - Regenerative Therapy

SN - 2352-3204

ER -