In Vivo Controlling of Cellular Response to Pig Islet Xenografts by Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of Either Membrane-Bound Human FasL or Human Decoy Fas

K. Kawamoto, M. Tanemura, T. Deguchi, T. Machida, T. Nishida, Y. Sawa, Y. Doki, Masaki Mori, T. Ito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The critical problem with clinical islet transplantation for patients with type 1 diabetes is the severe shortage of human donors. Pig islet xenotransplantation has the potential to provide a virtually unlimited source of donor pancreata. However, our previous studies demonstrated that cell-mediated rejection, especially human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated cytotoxicity, remains a major obstacle for long-term islet xenograft survival. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the overexpression of either membrane-bound human FasL (mFasL) or human decoy Fas antigen (decoy Fas) in pig islets not only prevented CTL xenocytotoxicity in vitro, but also prolonged histological survival of pig islet xenografts in vivo. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether adenoviral transfer of these genes into pig islets ex vivo prior to transplantation had a beneficial effect on posttransplantation glycemic control of diabetic recipients. Isolated pig islets were transfected with adenovirus vector carrying complementary DNA (cDNA) of either mFasL or decoy Fas. The transfected islets were transplanted under the kidney capsule of diabetic recipient rats. Rats transplanted with either mFasL- or decoy Fas-transfected pig islet grafts showed significantly suppressed blood glucose levels from 12 hours to 18 hours posttransplantation compared with control groups transplanted with empty vector-transfected pig islets. Unfortunately, blood glucose levels of these groups were increased, with no significant difference observed at 24 hours posttransplantation. However, transgenic expression of these molecules with clinically tolerable amount of immunosuppressants may be more effective to achieve islet xenograft survival in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-333
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Heterografts
Adenoviridae
Swine
Membranes
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Blood Glucose
Tissue Donors
CD95 Antigens
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Heterologous Transplantation
Immunosuppressive Agents
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Capsules
Pancreas
Complementary DNA
Transplantation
Transplants
Kidney
Control Groups
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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In Vivo Controlling of Cellular Response to Pig Islet Xenografts by Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of Either Membrane-Bound Human FasL or Human Decoy Fas. / Kawamoto, K.; Tanemura, M.; Deguchi, T.; Machida, T.; Nishida, T.; Sawa, Y.; Doki, Y.; Mori, Masaki; Ito, T.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 331-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawamoto, K. ; Tanemura, M. ; Deguchi, T. ; Machida, T. ; Nishida, T. ; Sawa, Y. ; Doki, Y. ; Mori, Masaki ; Ito, T. / In Vivo Controlling of Cellular Response to Pig Islet Xenografts by Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of Either Membrane-Bound Human FasL or Human Decoy Fas. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 331-333.
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