In vivo evaluation of bone-bonding of titanium metal chemically treated with a hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride

S. Kaneko, K. Tsuru, S. Hayakawa, S. Takemoto, C. Ohtsuki, T. Ozaki, H. Inoue, A. Osaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apatite formation on implants is important in achieving a direct bonding to bone tissue. We recently showed that titanium metal chemically treated with a hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride has the ability to form a hydroxyapatite layer in simulated body fluid which had inorganic ion composition similar to human blood plasma. In this study, a pure titanium cylinder (4.0mm in diameter, 20.0mm in length) treated with this method was implanted into a hole (4.2mm in diameter) in a rabbit's tibia. After implantation for predetermined periods up to 16 weeks, the specimens were extracted with bone tissue, and were examined by push-out test to evaluate the shearing force between the implant and bone tissue. The results were compared with those of non-treated pure titanium. Eight weeks after surgery, the shearing force of the treated titanium implanted in the 4.2mm-hole was significantly higher than that of non-treated titanium, although the surface roughness was not changed after the treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis showed that the bone comes very close to the surface of the treated titanium. Moreover, the shearing force was higher for the implanted sample in the 4.0mm-hole than that in the 4.2mm-hole. Thus, it is confirmed that the treatment with hydrogen peroxide solution containing tantalum chloride provides higher bonding ability on titanium implants in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-881
Number of pages7
JournalBiomaterials
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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