Inactivation of atmospheric bacteria using lytic enzyme mixture

M. Yamaguchi, Yusuke Tahara, M. Deguchi, J. Arai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mass of air breathed by a human per day is equivalent to 10-times the mass of food consumed in that time. However, fundamental safety measures for atmospheric bacterial control have not yet been implemented. The purpose of our research is to develop a cell wall lytic filter using a cell wall lytic enzyme, which can inactivate the bacteria in air that cause infectious diseases by decomposing their cell envelope. In this study, the use of lytic enzyme mixture was suggested, including glycosidase, protease and lipase. The performance of the lytic enzyme mixture was evaluated using lysozyme, a typical lytic enzyme, as a control. The substrate that we used was Micrococcus luteus, a gram-positive bacteria. The experimental results showed that the use of the lytic enzyme mixture exhibited a lytic rate per hour that was 13 - 39% greater than the control. Furthermore, although there are some different phases during bacterium multiplication, the lytic rate per hour improved for all of the phases when the lytic enzyme mixture was used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4994-4997
Number of pages4
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 VII
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacteria
Enzymes
Cell Wall
Air
Micrococcus luteus
Cells
Glycoside Hydrolases
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Muramidase
Lipase
Lipases
Communicable Diseases
Peptide Hydrolases
Safety
Food
Research
Substrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Inactivation of atmospheric bacteria using lytic enzyme mixture. / Yamaguchi, M.; Tahara, Yusuke; Deguchi, M.; Arai, J.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 26 VII, 2004, p. 4994-4997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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