Increase in telencephalic dopamine and cerebellar norepinephrine contents by hydrostatic pressure in goldfish: the possible involvement in hydrostatic pressure-related locomotion

Taro Ikegami, Akihiro Takemura, Eunjung Choi, Atsushi Suda, Shozo Tomonaga, Muhammad Badruzzaman, Mitsuhiro Furuse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fish are faced with a wide range of hydrostatic pressure (HP) in their natural habitats. Additionally, freshwater fish are occasionally exposed to rapid changes in HP due to heavy rainfall, flood and/or dam release. Accordingly, variations in HP are one of the most important environmental cues for fish. However, little information is available on how HP information is perceived and transmitted in the central nervous system of fish. The present study examined the effect of HP (water depth of 1.3 m) on the quantities of monoamines and their metabolites in the telencephalon, optic tectum, diencephalon, cerebellum (including partial mesencephalon) and vagal lobe (including medulla oblongata) of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, using high-performance liquid chromatography. HP affected monoamine and metabolite contents in restricted brain regions, including the telencephalon, cerebellum and vagal lobe. In particular, HP significantly increased the levels of dopamine (DA) in the telencephalon at 15 min and that of norepinephrine (NE) in the cerebellum at 30 min. In addition, HP also significantly increased locomotor activity at 15 and 30 min after HP treatment. It is possible that HP indirectly induces locomotion in goldfish via telencephalic DA and cerebellar NE neuronal activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1105-1115
Number of pages11
JournalFish Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 26 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Increase in telencephalic dopamine and cerebellar norepinephrine contents by hydrostatic pressure in goldfish: the possible involvement in hydrostatic pressure-related locomotion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this