Increased levels of oral Streptococcus-derived d-alanine in patients with chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus

Yusuke Nakade, Yasunori Iwata, Norihiko Sakai, Masashi Mita, Maiko Nakane, Kenji Hamase, Wataru Suda, Tadashi Toyama, Shinji Kitajima, Akinori Hara, Miho Shimizu, Chikako Ogushi, Kengo Furuichi, Yoshitaka Koshino, Hidetoshi Morita, Masahira Hattori, Takashi Wada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The number of patients on hemodialysis is increasing globally; diabetes mellitus (DM) complications is the major cause of hemodialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The d-amino acid (AA) profile is altered in patients with CKD; however, it has not been studied in patients with CKD and DM. Furthermore, bacteria responsible for altering the D-AA profile are not well understood. Therefore, we examined the D-AA profiles and associated bacteria in patients with CKD, with and without DM. We enrolled 12 healthy controls and 54 patients with CKD, with and without DM, and determined their salivary, stool, plasma, and urine chiral AA levels using two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography. We performed 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis of the oral and gut microbiota to determine the association between the abundance of bacterial species and D-AA levels. Plasma d-alanine and d-serine levels were higher in patients with CKD than in healthy adults (p < 0.01), and plasma d-alanine levels were higher in patients with CKD and DM than in those without DM. The abundance of salivary Streptococcus, which produced d-alanine, increased in patients with CKD and DM and was positively correlated with plasma d-alanine levels. Patients with CKD and DM had unique oral microbiota and d-alanine profiles. Plasma d-alanine is a potential biomarker for patients with CKD and DM.

Original languageEnglish
Article number21773
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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