Increased oxidative stress may lead to impaired adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rat

Yuichiro Kawano, Masayuki Ohta, Hidetoshi Eguchi, Yukio Iwashita, Masafumi Inomata, Seigo Kitano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: In the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rats, adaptive cytoprotection against ethanol-induced damage is impaired. The aim of this study was to determine relation between impaired adaptive cytoprotection and oxidative stress. Methods: Portal hypertension was produced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by inducing staged portal vein occlusion. Oxidative stress levels were evaluated by measuring malondialdehyde and nitrotyrosine levels in the rat gastric mucosa with or without 10% ethanol pretreatment. Inhibition of oxidative stress by an anti-oxidant agent was estimated, and glutathione levels were also measured. Adaptive cytoprotection to 70% ethanol treatment was evaluated by measuring the gastric mucosal injury index in the presence or absence of the anti-oxidant. Results: The portal hypertensive gastric mucosa pretreated with 10% ethanol had significantly higher oxidative stress levels than the mucosa not pretreated with 10% ethanol. However, the sham-operated gastric mucosa pretreated with 10% ethanol had significantly lower oxidative stress levels than the mucosa not pretreated with 10% ethanol. Pretreatment with 10% ethanol increased glutathione levels in the sham-operated but not in the portal hypertensive gastric mucosa. Administration of the anti-oxidant agent prior to 10% ethanol pretreatment significantly reduced oxidative stress levels, increased glutathione levels, and decreased the injury index in response to 70% ethanol in the portal hypertensive gastric mucosa. Conclusion: Increased oxidative stress may lead to impaired adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rats, probably through damage to the system of endogenous anti-oxidant production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)639-644
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

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Cytoprotection
Gastric Mucosa
Oxidative Stress
Ethanol
Oxidants
Glutathione
Mucous Membrane
Wounds and Injuries
Portal Hypertension
Portal Vein
Malondialdehyde
Sprague Dawley Rats
Stomach

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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Increased oxidative stress may lead to impaired adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rat. / Kawano, Yuichiro; Ohta, Masayuki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Iwashita, Yukio; Inomata, Masafumi; Kitano, Seigo.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 639-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawano, Yuichiro ; Ohta, Masayuki ; Eguchi, Hidetoshi ; Iwashita, Yukio ; Inomata, Masafumi ; Kitano, Seigo. / Increased oxidative stress may lead to impaired adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rat. In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia). 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 639-644.
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