Indentation-induced deformation behavior in martensitic steel observed through in-situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscopy

T. Ohmura, A. Minor, K. Tsuzaki, J. W. Morris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deformation behavior in the vicinity of grain boundary in Fe-0.4wt%C tempered martensitic steel were studied through in-situ nanoindentation in a TEM. Two types of boundaries were imaged in the dislocated martensitic structure: a low-angle lath boundary and a high-angle block boundary. In the case of a low-angle grain boundary, the dislocations induced by the indenter piled up against the boundary. As the indenter penetrated further, a critical stress appears to have been reached and a high density of dislocations was suddenly emitted on the far side of the grain boundary into the adjacent grain. In the case of the high-angle grain boundary, the numerous dislocations that were produced by the indentation were simply absorbed into the boundary, with no indication of pile-up or the transmission of strain.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation, NanoSPD3 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Nanomaterials by Severe Plastics Deformation
Pages239-244
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd International Conference on Nanomaterials by Severe Plastics Deformation, NanoSPD3 - Fukuoka, Japan
Duration: Sep 22 2005Sep 26 2005

Publication series

NameMaterials Science Forum
Volume503-504
ISSN (Print)0255-5476

Other

Other3rd International Conference on Nanomaterials by Severe Plastics Deformation, NanoSPD3
CountryJapan
CityFukuoka
Period9/22/059/26/05

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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