Influence of antibiotic exposure in the early postnatal period on the development of intestinal microbiota

Shigemitsu Tanaka, Takako Kobayashi, Prapa Songjinda, Atsushi Tateyama, Mina Tsubouchi, Chikako Kiyohara, Taro Shirakawa, Kenji Sonomoto, Jiro Nakayama

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192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of antibiotic exposure in the early postnatal period on the development of intestinal microbiota was monitored in 26 infants including five antibiotic-treated (AT) subjects orally administered a broad-spectrum antibiotic for the first 4 days of life and three caesarean-delivered (CD) subjects whose mothers were intravenously injected by the similar type of antibiotics in the same period. The faecal bacterial composition was analysed daily for the first 5 days and monthly for the first 2 months. Terminal restriction fragment length polymor-phisms in the AT subjects showed less diversity with the attenuation of the colonization of some bacterial groups, especially in Bifidobacterium and unusual colonization of Enterococcus in the first week than the control antibiotic-free infants (AF, n=18). Quantitative real-time PCR showed overgrowth of enterococci (day 3, P=0.01; day 5, P=0.003; month 1, P=0.01) and arrested growth of Bifidobacterium (day 3, P=0.03) in the AT group. Furthermore, after 1 month, the Enterobacteriaceae population was markedly higher in the AT group than in the AF group (month 1, P=0.02; month 2, P=0.02). CD infants sustained similar, although relatively weaker, alteration in the developing microbiota. These results indicate that antibiotic exposure at the beginning of life greatly influences the development of neonatal intestinal microbiota.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-87
Number of pages8
JournalFEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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