Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines

K. Takasaki, K. Groth, K. Maeda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nowadays not only small, high speed diesel engines for automobiles, but also larger sized, medium and low speed engines for locomotives, generators and ships will be under some exhaust emissions restrictions. However, not much emissions research work on larger engines has been performed to establish whether measures used for reducing emissions of smaller engines are also effective on larger ones. This present paper covers emission data from four diesel engines having a bore of 110, 200, 320 and 450mm. The influence of (1) the size or speed of engine, (2) the fuel (gas oil or bunker fuel oil) and (3) means used to reduce NOx emissions such as 'fuel injection timing retard' and 'exhaust gas re-circulation' are discussed. One reason for higher particulate emissions from bunker fuel oil is clarified using the visualization of burning spray in a model combustion chamber.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE
EditorsT. Uzkan
PublisherASME
Pages63-70
Number of pages8
Volume26-1
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Part 3 (of 3) - Youngstown, OH, USA
Duration: Apr 21 1996Apr 24 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Part 3 (of 3)
CityYoungstown, OH, USA
Period4/21/964/24/96

Fingerprint

Diesel engines
Engines
Fuel oils
Exhaust gas recirculation
Particulate emissions
Locomotives
Gas fuels
Fuel injection
Gas oils
Combustion chambers
Automobiles
Ships
Visualization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Takasaki, K., Groth, K., & Maeda, K. (1996). Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines. In T. Uzkan (Ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE (Vol. 26-1, pp. 63-70). ASME.

Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines. / Takasaki, K.; Groth, K.; Maeda, K.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE. ed. / T. Uzkan. Vol. 26-1 ASME, 1996. p. 63-70.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Takasaki, K, Groth, K & Maeda, K 1996, Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines. in T Uzkan (ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE. vol. 26-1, ASME, pp. 63-70, Proceedings of the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Part 3 (of 3), Youngstown, OH, USA, 4/21/96.
Takasaki K, Groth K, Maeda K. Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines. In Uzkan T, editor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE. Vol. 26-1. ASME. 1996. p. 63-70
Takasaki, K. ; Groth, K. ; Maeda, K. / Influence of engine size and fuel properties on exhaust emissions from diesel engines. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Internal Combustion Engine Division (Publication) ICE. editor / T. Uzkan. Vol. 26-1 ASME, 1996. pp. 63-70
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