Influence of psychiatric disorders on surgical outcomes and care resource use in Japan

Toshiki Maeda, Akira Babazono, Takumi Nishi, Kazumitsu Tamaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of psychiatric disorders on major surgery outcomes and care resource use. Methods: This study adopted a retrospective cohort study design. The samples consisted of hospital stays. Subjects were patients who had undergone major surgery. We used multilevel regression analysis to quantify the influence of psychiatric disorders on major surgery outcomes and care resource use. Results: The total number of hospital stays included in the study was 5569, of which 250 were patients with psychiatric disorders. Compared with those without psychiatric disorders, those with schizophrenia had a significantly higher risk of complications, and those with neurotic disorder tended to have fewer complications. Total cost was significantly higher for those with schizophrenia and mood disorder and significantly lower in those with neurotic disorder. Lengths of stay were significantly longer for those with schizophrenia and mood disorder but not for those with neurotic disorder. Post-surgical mortality was equivalent among those with any psychiatric disorder and among those without a psychiatric disorder. Conclusion: The study revealed that surgical outcomes and care resource use are differentiated by psychiatric disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-527
Number of pages5
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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