Influence of snow on iron release from soil

Mayumi Seto, Tasuku Akagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The concentration of Fe in stream water and groundwater was measured monthly during a whole year. The study fields were Ozenuma lake and Senjougahara peatland, which snow covers for more than 5 months in winter. Iron concentration in water increased during snow-covered and thaw seasons with the synchronized decrease in Eh and pH for both stream water and groundwater. In snow-covered seasons, it is hypothesized that supply of melt water and/or coverage with ice layers during this period could cause the development of an anaerobic zone in underlying soil. This study suggests that change in the amount of snowfall or in the length of snow season may influence the geochemical cycle of iron.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-183
Number of pages11
JournalGEOCHEMICAL JOURNAL
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

snow
Snow
soils
Iron
Soils
iron
ground water
Water
water
geochemical cycle
groundwater
soil
Groundwater
snow cover
meltwater
peatland
lakes
winter
ice
Ice

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Influence of snow on iron release from soil. / Seto, Mayumi; Akagi, Tasuku.

In: GEOCHEMICAL JOURNAL, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 173-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seto, Mayumi ; Akagi, Tasuku. / Influence of snow on iron release from soil. In: GEOCHEMICAL JOURNAL. 2005 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 173-183.
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