Influence of using texture information in remote sensed data on the accuracy of forest type classification at different levels of spatial resolution

Tetsuji Ota, Nobuya Mizoue, Shigejiro Yoshida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated the influence of texture information from remote sensed data on the accuracy of forest type classification at different spatial resolutions. We used 4-m spatial resolution imagery to create five different sets of imagery with lower spatial resolutions down to 30 m. We classified forest type using spectral information alone, texture information alone, and spectral and texture information combined at each spatial resolution, and compared the classification accuracy at each resolution. The classification and regression tree method was used for classification. The accuracy of all three tests decreased slightly with lower spatial resolution. The accuracy with the combined data was generally higher than with either the spectral or texture information alone. At most resolutions, the lowest accuracy was with texture information alone. However, there was no clear difference in accuracy between the combined data and spectral data alone at 25- and 30-m spatial resolution. These results indicate that adding texture information to spatial information improves the accuracy of forest type classification from very high resolution (4-m spatial resolution) to medium resolution imagery (20-m spatial resolution), but this accuracy improvement does not appear to hold for relatively coarse resolution imagery (25- to 30-m spatial resolution).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)432-437
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Forest Research
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2011

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forest types
spatial resolution
texture
imagery
spectral analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry

Cite this

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abstract = "We evaluated the influence of texture information from remote sensed data on the accuracy of forest type classification at different spatial resolutions. We used 4-m spatial resolution imagery to create five different sets of imagery with lower spatial resolutions down to 30 m. We classified forest type using spectral information alone, texture information alone, and spectral and texture information combined at each spatial resolution, and compared the classification accuracy at each resolution. The classification and regression tree method was used for classification. The accuracy of all three tests decreased slightly with lower spatial resolution. The accuracy with the combined data was generally higher than with either the spectral or texture information alone. At most resolutions, the lowest accuracy was with texture information alone. However, there was no clear difference in accuracy between the combined data and spectral data alone at 25- and 30-m spatial resolution. These results indicate that adding texture information to spatial information improves the accuracy of forest type classification from very high resolution (4-m spatial resolution) to medium resolution imagery (20-m spatial resolution), but this accuracy improvement does not appear to hold for relatively coarse resolution imagery (25- to 30-m spatial resolution).",
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