Infrasound array observations in the Lützow-Holm Bay region, East Antarctica

Takahiko Murayama, Masaki Kanao, Masa Yuki Yamamoto, Yoshiaki Ishihara, Takeshi Matsushima, Yoshihiro Kakinami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characteristic features of infrasound waves observed in Antarctica reveal a physical interaction involving surface environmental variations in the continent and the surrounding Southern Ocean. A single infrasound sensor has been making continuous recordings since 2008 at Syowa Station (SYO; 69.0S, 39.6E) in the Lützow-Holm Bay (LHB) of East Antarctica. The continuously recorded data clearly show the contamination of background oceanic signals (microbaroms) throughout all seasons. In austral summer 2013, several field stations with infrasound sensors were established along the coast of the LHB. Two infrasound arrays of different diameters were set up: one at SYO (with a 100-m spacing triangle) and one in the S16 area on the continental ice sheet (with a 1000-m spacing triangle). In addition to these arrays, isolated single stations were deployed at two outcrops in the LHB. These newly established arrays clearly detected the propagation direction and frequency content of microbaroms from the Southern Ocean. Microbarom measurements are a useful tool for characterizing ocean wave climates, complementing other oceanographic and geophysical data from the Antarctic. In addition to the microbaroms, several other remarkable infrasound signals were detected, including regional earthquakes, and airburst shock waves emanating from a meteoroid entering the atmosphere over the Russian Republic on 15 February 2013. Detailed and continuous measurements of infrasound waves in Antarctica could prove to be a new proxy for monitoring regional environmental change as well as temporal climate variations in high southern latitudes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-50
Number of pages16
JournalPolar Science
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Antarctica
oceans
spatial distribution
climate
earthquakes
spacing
ice
sensor
coasts
wave climate
monitoring
climate variation
ocean wave
summer
ocean
shock wave
ice sheet
infrasound
environmental change
outcrop

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Infrasound array observations in the Lützow-Holm Bay region, East Antarctica. / Murayama, Takahiko; Kanao, Masaki; Yamamoto, Masa Yuki; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Matsushima, Takeshi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro.

In: Polar Science, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 35-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murayama, T, Kanao, M, Yamamoto, MY, Ishihara, Y, Matsushima, T & Kakinami, Y 2015, 'Infrasound array observations in the Lützow-Holm Bay region, East Antarctica', Polar Science, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 35-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polar.2014.07.005
Murayama, Takahiko ; Kanao, Masaki ; Yamamoto, Masa Yuki ; Ishihara, Yoshiaki ; Matsushima, Takeshi ; Kakinami, Yoshihiro. / Infrasound array observations in the Lützow-Holm Bay region, East Antarctica. In: Polar Science. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 35-50.
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