ING proteins as potential anticancer drug targets

Motoko Unoki, K. Kumamoto, Curtis C. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent emerging evidence suggests that ING family proteins play roles in carcinogenesis both as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes depending on the family members and on cell status. Previous results from non-physiologic overexpression experiments showed that all five family members induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, thus it had been thought until very recently that all of the family members function as tumor suppressor genes. Therefore restoration of ING family proteins in cancer cells has been proposed as a treatment for cancers. However, ING2 knockdown experiments showed unexpected results: ING2 knockdown led to senescence in normal human fibroblast cells and suppressed cancer cell growth. ING2 is also overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and promotes cancer cell invasion through an MMP13 dependent pathway. Additionally, it was reported that ING2 has two isoforms, ING2a and ING2b. Although expression of ING2a predominates compared with ING2b, both isoforms confer resistance against cell cycle arrest or apoptosis to cancer cells, thus knockdown of both isoforms is critical to remove this resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that ING2 can function as an oncogene in some specific types of cancer cells, indicating restoration of this gene in cancer cells could cause cancer progression. Because knockdown of ING2 suppresses cancer cell invasion and induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, ING2 may be an anticancer drug target. In this brief review, we discuss possible clinical applications of ING2 with the latest knowledge of molecular targeted therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-454
Number of pages13
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 14 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Cells
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proteins
Neoplasms
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Protein Isoforms
Apoptosis
Genes
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Oncogenes
Restoration
Tumors
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Neoplasm Genes
Cell growth
Fibroblasts
Colorectal Neoplasms
Carcinogenesis
Experiments
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

ING proteins as potential anticancer drug targets. / Unoki, Motoko; Kumamoto, K.; Harris, Curtis C.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 10, No. 5, 14.08.2009, p. 442-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Unoki, Motoko ; Kumamoto, K. ; Harris, Curtis C. / ING proteins as potential anticancer drug targets. In: Current Drug Targets. 2009 ; Vol. 10, No. 5. pp. 442-454.
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