Insulin Treatment Attenuates Decline of Muscle Mass in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Ryotaro Bouchi, Tatsuya Fukuda, Takato Takeuchi, Yujiro Nakano, Masanori Murakami, Isao Minami, Hajime Izumiyama, Koshi Hashimoto, Takanobu Yoshimoto, Yoshihiro Ogawa

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sarcopenia is defined as an age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, and is a major cause of disability and mobility limitations. Recent studies have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes and insulin signaling deficiencies contribute to the progression of sarcopenia, suggesting that a sufficient supply of insulin to the skeletal muscles may be important for the maintenance of muscle function; however, little has been reported regarding whether insulin treatment can protect against sarcopenia. We conducted a retrospective observational study to examine the impact of insulin treatment on the muscle mass of patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 312 patients (mean age: 64 ± 11 years; 40.8% female; 27.6% treated with insulin) were studied in this retrospective observational study. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) and grip strength (kg) were used to assess sarcopenia. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 18.0%. Insulin treatment was shown to be protective against the annual decline of SMI (standardized β 0.195; p = 0.025) even after adjusting for covariates, including age, gender, duration of diabetes, and body mass index. In a cohort matched by propensity scores, insulin treatment significantly increased the 1-year change in SMI (mean ± SE) compared with non-insulin-treated group (2.40 ± 0.98% vs. −0.43 ± 0.98%; p = 0.050). Our data suggest that insulin treatment could attenuate the progression of sarcopenia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCalcified Tissue International
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2017

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Endocrinology

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