Intentionally Added Ionic Surfactants Induce Jones-Ray Effect at Air-Water Interface

Yuki Uematsu, Kengo Chida, Hiroki Matsubara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Jones-Ray effect is an anomalous minimum in the surface tension of aqueous electrolytes at millimolar salt concentrations. We experimentally demonstrated that intentionally added ionic surfactants induce the Jones-Ray effect. The one-dimensional Poisson-Boltzmann theory, including the effect of surfactant adsorption and salt depletion, excellently agrees with the obtained experimental data. All the parameters of the ion-specific surface affinities used in the theory are consistent with previous experiments. These results strongly suggest that the Jones-Ray effect observed so far has been induced by the inevitable contamination of the air-water interfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-48
Number of pages4
JournalColloids and Interface Science Communications
Volume27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Surface-Active Agents
rays
Surface active agents
Salts
surfactants
Air
Surface Tension
Water
air
water
Electrolytes
Adsorption
Surface tension
Contamination
Ions
salts
affinity
interfacial tension
depletion
contamination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Intentionally Added Ionic Surfactants Induce Jones-Ray Effect at Air-Water Interface. / Uematsu, Yuki; Chida, Kengo; Matsubara, Hiroki.

In: Colloids and Interface Science Communications, Vol. 27, 01.11.2018, p. 45-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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