Internal Structure of a Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit by Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Okinawa Trough

K. Ishizu, T. Goto, Y. Ohta, T. Kasaya, H. Iwamoto, C. Vachiratienchai, W. Siripunvaraporn, T. Tsuji, H. Kumagai, K. Koike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are crucially important metal resources that contain high-grade metals such as copper, lead, and zinc, their internal structures and generation mechanisms remain unclear. This study obtained detailed near-seafloor images of electrical resistivity in a hydrothermal field off Okinawa, southwestern Japan, using deep-towed marine electrical resistivity tomography. The image clarified a semi-layered resistivity structure, interpreted as SMS deposits exposed on the seafloor, and another deep-seated SMS layer at about 40-m depth below the seafloor. The images reinforce our inference of a new mechanism of SMS evolution: Upwelling hydrothermal fluid is trapped under less-permeable cap rock. The deeper embedded SMS accumulates there. Then hydrothermal fluids expelled on the seafloor form exposed SMS deposits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11025-11034
Number of pages10
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume46
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 28 2019

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massive sulfide
troughs
tomography
sulfides
electrical resistivity
trough
seafloor
deposits
hydrothermal fluid
fluids
upwelling water
inference
caps
metals
grade
Japan
resources
zinc
cap rock
rocks

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ishizu, K., Goto, T., Ohta, Y., Kasaya, T., Iwamoto, H., Vachiratienchai, C., ... Koike, K. (2019). Internal Structure of a Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit by Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Okinawa Trough. Geophysical Research Letters, 46(20), 11025-11034. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GL083749

Internal Structure of a Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit by Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Okinawa Trough. / Ishizu, K.; Goto, T.; Ohta, Y.; Kasaya, T.; Iwamoto, H.; Vachiratienchai, C.; Siripunvaraporn, W.; Tsuji, T.; Kumagai, H.; Koike, K.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, No. 20, 28.10.2019, p. 11025-11034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishizu, K, Goto, T, Ohta, Y, Kasaya, T, Iwamoto, H, Vachiratienchai, C, Siripunvaraporn, W, Tsuji, T, Kumagai, H & Koike, K 2019, 'Internal Structure of a Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit by Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Okinawa Trough', Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 46, no. 20, pp. 11025-11034. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GL083749
Ishizu, K. ; Goto, T. ; Ohta, Y. ; Kasaya, T. ; Iwamoto, H. ; Vachiratienchai, C. ; Siripunvaraporn, W. ; Tsuji, T. ; Kumagai, H. ; Koike, K. / Internal Structure of a Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposit by Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Okinawa Trough. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2019 ; Vol. 46, No. 20. pp. 11025-11034.
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