Interrelationship of oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, and cognitive ability with activities of daily living in Japanese elderly people receiving home care services due to physical disabilities

Michiko Furuta, Manae Komiya-Nonaka, Sumio Akifusa, Yoshihiro Shimazaki, Munehisa Adachi, Toshinori Kinoshita, Takeshi Kikutani, Yoshihisa Yamashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Malnutrition and cognitive impairment lead to declines in activities of daily living (ADL). Nutritional status and cognitive ability have been shown to correlate with oral health status and swallowing function. However, the complex relationship among the factors that affect decline in ADL is not understood. We examined direct and indirect relationships among oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, cognitive ability, and ADL in Japanese elderly people living at home and receiving home care services because of physical disabilities. Methods: Participants were 286 subjects aged 60 years and older (mean age, 84.5 ± 7.9 years) living at home and receiving home care services. Oral health status (the number of teeth and wearing dentures) was assessed, and swallowing function was examined using cervical auscultation. Additionally, ADL, cognitive ability, and nutritional status were assessed using the Barthel Index, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, respectively. Path analysis was used to test pathways from these factors to ADL. Results: The mean number of teeth present in the participants was 8.6 ± 9.9 (edentates, 40.6%). Dysphagia, malnutrition, and severe cognitive impairment were found in 31.1%, 14.0%, and 21.3% of the participants, respectively. Path analysis indicated that poor oral health status and cognitive impairment had a direct effect on denture wearing, and the consequent dysphagia, in addition to cognitive impairment, was positively associated with malnutrition. Malnutrition as well as dysphagia and cognitive impairment directly limited ADL. Conclusions: A lower number of teeth are positively related to swallowing dysfunction, whereas denture wearing contributes to recovery of swallowing function. Dysphagia, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition directly and indirectly decreased ADL in elderly people living at home and receiving home nursing care. The findings suggest that preventing tooth loss and encouraging denture wearing when teeth are lost may indirectly contribute to maintaining or improving ADL, mediated by recovery of swallowing function and nutritional status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-181
Number of pages9
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2013

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Aptitude
Oral Health
Deglutition
Home Care Services
Activities of Daily Living
Nutritional Status
Health Status
Malnutrition
Dentures
Deglutition Disorders
Tooth
Recovery of Function
Home Nursing
Auscultation
Tooth Loss
Nutrition Assessment
Nursing Care
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Interrelationship of oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, and cognitive ability with activities of daily living in Japanese elderly people receiving home care services due to physical disabilities. / Furuta, Michiko; Komiya-Nonaka, Manae; Akifusa, Sumio; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Adachi, Munehisa; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Kikutani, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 173-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Malnutrition and cognitive impairment lead to declines in activities of daily living (ADL). Nutritional status and cognitive ability have been shown to correlate with oral health status and swallowing function. However, the complex relationship among the factors that affect decline in ADL is not understood. We examined direct and indirect relationships among oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, cognitive ability, and ADL in Japanese elderly people living at home and receiving home care services because of physical disabilities. Methods: Participants were 286 subjects aged 60 years and older (mean age, 84.5 ± 7.9 years) living at home and receiving home care services. Oral health status (the number of teeth and wearing dentures) was assessed, and swallowing function was examined using cervical auscultation. Additionally, ADL, cognitive ability, and nutritional status were assessed using the Barthel Index, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, respectively. Path analysis was used to test pathways from these factors to ADL. Results: The mean number of teeth present in the participants was 8.6 ± 9.9 (edentates, 40.6{\%}). Dysphagia, malnutrition, and severe cognitive impairment were found in 31.1{\%}, 14.0{\%}, and 21.3{\%} of the participants, respectively. Path analysis indicated that poor oral health status and cognitive impairment had a direct effect on denture wearing, and the consequent dysphagia, in addition to cognitive impairment, was positively associated with malnutrition. Malnutrition as well as dysphagia and cognitive impairment directly limited ADL. Conclusions: A lower number of teeth are positively related to swallowing dysfunction, whereas denture wearing contributes to recovery of swallowing function. Dysphagia, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition directly and indirectly decreased ADL in elderly people living at home and receiving home nursing care. The findings suggest that preventing tooth loss and encouraging denture wearing when teeth are lost may indirectly contribute to maintaining or improving ADL, mediated by recovery of swallowing function and nutritional status.",
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AU - Furuta, Michiko

AU - Komiya-Nonaka, Manae

AU - Akifusa, Sumio

AU - Shimazaki, Yoshihiro

AU - Adachi, Munehisa

AU - Kinoshita, Toshinori

AU - Kikutani, Takeshi

AU - Yamashita, Yoshihisa

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AB - Objectives: Malnutrition and cognitive impairment lead to declines in activities of daily living (ADL). Nutritional status and cognitive ability have been shown to correlate with oral health status and swallowing function. However, the complex relationship among the factors that affect decline in ADL is not understood. We examined direct and indirect relationships among oral health status, swallowing function, nutritional status, cognitive ability, and ADL in Japanese elderly people living at home and receiving home care services because of physical disabilities. Methods: Participants were 286 subjects aged 60 years and older (mean age, 84.5 ± 7.9 years) living at home and receiving home care services. Oral health status (the number of teeth and wearing dentures) was assessed, and swallowing function was examined using cervical auscultation. Additionally, ADL, cognitive ability, and nutritional status were assessed using the Barthel Index, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, respectively. Path analysis was used to test pathways from these factors to ADL. Results: The mean number of teeth present in the participants was 8.6 ± 9.9 (edentates, 40.6%). Dysphagia, malnutrition, and severe cognitive impairment were found in 31.1%, 14.0%, and 21.3% of the participants, respectively. Path analysis indicated that poor oral health status and cognitive impairment had a direct effect on denture wearing, and the consequent dysphagia, in addition to cognitive impairment, was positively associated with malnutrition. Malnutrition as well as dysphagia and cognitive impairment directly limited ADL. Conclusions: A lower number of teeth are positively related to swallowing dysfunction, whereas denture wearing contributes to recovery of swallowing function. Dysphagia, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition directly and indirectly decreased ADL in elderly people living at home and receiving home nursing care. The findings suggest that preventing tooth loss and encouraging denture wearing when teeth are lost may indirectly contribute to maintaining or improving ADL, mediated by recovery of swallowing function and nutritional status.

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