Intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-6 induces thermal hyperalgesia in rats

Takakazu Oka, Kae Oka, Masako Hosoi, Tetsuro Hori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We assessed the effect of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brain on nociception by using the hot-plate test in rats. Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6, 30 pg-300 ng) was microinjected into the lateral cerebroventricle (LCV) and the paw-withdrawal latency was then measured for 60 min after injection. RhIL-6 at 300 pg reduced the paw-withdrawal latency at 15 min after injection. Further increase of rhIL-6 doses to 3, 30 and 300 ng resulted in the decreased paw-withdrawal latency at 15 and 30 min. Although the peak responses observed at 3-300 ng did not differ significantly, the time taken for recovery tended to be longer with increasing doses. The rhIL-6 (30 ng)-induced reduction of the paw-withdrawal latency was completely blocked by the co-injection of either Na salicylate (30 ng, LCV) or α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (30 ng, LCV), an anti-cytokine substance. However, it was not affected by the co-injection of IL-1 receptor antagonist (30 ng, LCV) which had been previously shown to be able to block IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia. These findings indicate that IL-6 in the brain induces hyperalgesia by its prostanoids-dependent action in rats. The hyperalgesic action of central IL-6 thus does not appear to depend on the action of IL-1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Research
Volume692
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 1995

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Hyperalgesia
Interleukin-6
Injections
Interleukin-1
Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormones
Nociception
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Salicylates
Brain
Prostaglandins
Cytokines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-6 induces thermal hyperalgesia in rats. / Oka, Takakazu; Oka, Kae; Hosoi, Masako; Hori, Tetsuro.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 692, No. 1-2, 18.09.1995, p. 123-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oka, Takakazu ; Oka, Kae ; Hosoi, Masako ; Hori, Tetsuro. / Intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-6 induces thermal hyperalgesia in rats. In: Brain Research. 1995 ; Vol. 692, No. 1-2. pp. 123-128.
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