Introgression and Habitat Segregation in a Pair of Ladybird Beetle Species in the Genus Propylea (Coccinellidae, Coccinellinae) in Northern Japan

Hiromu Suga, Wataru Hirano, Toru Katoh, Kei W. Matsubayashi, Haruo Katakura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The ladybird beetles Propylea quatuordecimpunctata and P. japonica have largely overlapping distributions in northern Japan, and in the laboratory produce fertile hybrids. In this study, we surveyed the distribution and morphological differentiation of these species and the hybrids in natural populations, with a focus on western Hokkaido, northern Japan. Phenotypic analyses were conducted for 987 individuals collected at 90 localities. In addition, the nuclear internal transcribed spacer-II (ITS2) region (549 bp) and part of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene (700 bp) were sequenced for 620 individuals from 53 localities. Analyses of both phenotypic and genotypic features discriminated two distinct entities assignable to P. quatuordecimpunctata and P. japonica. However, individuals with intermediate phenotypes and/or genotypes also occurred extensively, indicating natural hybridization. Putative P. quatuordecimpunctata individuals were collected across a wide range of altitudes (30-600 m), whereas those of P. japonica were found mostly lower than 300 m alt. In addition, P. quatuordecimpunctata was dominant in semi-open habitats shaded by canopy foliage, whereas P. japonica was frequent in more open habitats. The perceived altitudinal difference in the distributions may thus in part be a consequence of this different habitat preference, as open habitats are more common at lower altitudes in the study area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-610
Number of pages8
JournalZoological science
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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Propylea quatuordecimpunctata
Propylea
Coccinellidae
introgression
Japan
Coleoptera
habitats
habitat preferences
cytochrome-c oxidase
internal transcribed spacers
hybridization
canopy
phenotype
genotype
leaves
genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Introgression and Habitat Segregation in a Pair of Ladybird Beetle Species in the Genus Propylea (Coccinellidae, Coccinellinae) in Northern Japan. / Suga, Hiromu; Hirano, Wataru; Katoh, Toru; Matsubayashi, Kei W.; Katakura, Haruo.

In: Zoological science, Vol. 33, No. 6, 12.2016, p. 603-610.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "The ladybird beetles Propylea quatuordecimpunctata and P. japonica have largely overlapping distributions in northern Japan, and in the laboratory produce fertile hybrids. In this study, we surveyed the distribution and morphological differentiation of these species and the hybrids in natural populations, with a focus on western Hokkaido, northern Japan. Phenotypic analyses were conducted for 987 individuals collected at 90 localities. In addition, the nuclear internal transcribed spacer-II (ITS2) region (549 bp) and part of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene (700 bp) were sequenced for 620 individuals from 53 localities. Analyses of both phenotypic and genotypic features discriminated two distinct entities assignable to P. quatuordecimpunctata and P. japonica. However, individuals with intermediate phenotypes and/or genotypes also occurred extensively, indicating natural hybridization. Putative P. quatuordecimpunctata individuals were collected across a wide range of altitudes (30-600 m), whereas those of P. japonica were found mostly lower than 300 m alt. In addition, P. quatuordecimpunctata was dominant in semi-open habitats shaded by canopy foliage, whereas P. japonica was frequent in more open habitats. The perceived altitudinal difference in the distributions may thus in part be a consequence of this different habitat preference, as open habitats are more common at lower altitudes in the study area.",
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