Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract

Kazuya Yokota, Satoshi Ishikawa, Yosuke Koba, Shinya Kijimoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Diseases occurring near the vocal cords, such as laryngeal cancer, often cause voice disturbance as an initial symptom. As an acoustic diagnostic method for such diseases, the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain) scale is widely used, but its objectivity is not well established. Instead, more accurate diagnosis may be possible by capturing the waveform of the volume velocity at the vocal cords (the vocal sound-source waveform). The aim of this study is to enable diagnosis of diseases near the vocal cords by identifying the sound-source waveform from voice measurements. In the proposed method, an analytical model of the vocal tract is used to identify the sound source. The air inside the vocal tract is modeled as concentrated masses connected by linear springs and dampers. The vocal tract shape is identified by making the natural frequencies of the analytical model correspond to the measured formant frequencies. The sound-source waveform is calculated from the analytical model by applying the measured voice (sound pressure) to the lip position of the identified vocal tract. To assess the validity of the proposed method, an experimental device was made to simulate the human voice mechanism. The device is equipped with artificial vocal cords made of a urethane elastomer that are self-excited by air flow. The sound pressure equivalent to the voice was measured using a microphone set at the lip position of the experimental device, and the flow velocity at the artificial vocal cords was measured using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). To assess the model's validity, the sound-source waveform identified from the measured sound pressure was compared with the waveform measured using the LDV

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019
PublisherCanadian Acoustical Association
ISBN (Electronic)9781999181000
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019
Event26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: Jul 7 2019Jul 11 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019

Conference

Conference26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period7/7/197/11/19

Fingerprint

vocal cords
waveforms
acoustics
sound pressure
laser doppler velocimeters
urethanes
dampers
air flow
elastomers
microphones
resonant frequencies
grade
disturbances
roughness
flow velocity
cancer
causes
air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Yokota, K., Ishikawa, S., Koba, Y., & Kijimoto, S. (2019). Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract. In Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019 (Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019). Canadian Acoustical Association.

Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract. / Yokota, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Koba, Yosuke; Kijimoto, Shinya.

Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019. Canadian Acoustical Association, 2019. (Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yokota, K, Ishikawa, S, Koba, Y & Kijimoto, S 2019, Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract. in Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019. Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019, Canadian Acoustical Association, 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019, Montreal, Canada, 7/7/19.
Yokota K, Ishikawa S, Koba Y, Kijimoto S. Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract. In Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019. Canadian Acoustical Association. 2019. (Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019).
Yokota, Kazuya ; Ishikawa, Satoshi ; Koba, Yosuke ; Kijimoto, Shinya. / Inverse analysis of vocal sound source by acoustic analysis of the vocal tract. Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019. Canadian Acoustical Association, 2019. (Proceedings of the 26th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2019).
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