Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: An international study

Anne Maree Dowd, Kenshi Itaoka, Peta Ashworth, Aya Saito, Marjolein de Best-Waldhober

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Discussions, opinions and decisions regarding options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions are often underpinned by an assumption that people know what carbon dioxide (CO2) is and how it behaves. Nevertheless, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest this is actually the case. Renewable energy technologies as well as technologies such as CO2 capture and storage (CCS) present potential solutions for mitigating the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In discussions and information provided on climate change and mitigation technologies, CO2 is referred to regularly, particularly in regards to CCS, as CO2 is the fundamental underpinnings of the technology. Yet surprisingly little research has investigated levels of knowledge and understanding of CO2 and how this affects perceptions and understanding of energy technologies, especially CCS. With a sample of 2470 participants from three countries (Australia, the Netherlands and Japan), our research found respondents had a general understanding of CO2 but poor knowledge of its scientific dimensions. These misperceptions were directly related to misperceptions of CCS, yet indirectly related to their opinion on the implementation of the technology. It was found that providing information on the scientific characteristics of CO2 reduced misunderstanding of CCS and mitigated some change in opinion formation on CCS implementation. Overall, our research demonstrated that assumed knowledge of CO2 in the general public is partially flawed and has the potential to impact future dialogue and uptake of mitigation options.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-87
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint

mitigation
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
Climate change
Carbon dioxide
greenhouse gas
carbon dioxide
climate change
opinion
energy technology
decision
public

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Energy(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS : An international study. / Dowd, Anne Maree; Itaoka, Kenshi; Ashworth, Peta; Saito, Aya; de Best-Waldhober, Marjolein.

In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 28, 09.2014, p. 79-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dowd, Anne Maree ; Itaoka, Kenshi ; Ashworth, Peta ; Saito, Aya ; de Best-Waldhober, Marjolein. / Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS : An international study. In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control. 2014 ; Vol. 28. pp. 79-87.
@article{75e418bc0c9b4140b12175e5083f55a5,
title = "Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: An international study",
abstract = "Discussions, opinions and decisions regarding options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions are often underpinned by an assumption that people know what carbon dioxide (CO2) is and how it behaves. Nevertheless, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest this is actually the case. Renewable energy technologies as well as technologies such as CO2 capture and storage (CCS) present potential solutions for mitigating the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In discussions and information provided on climate change and mitigation technologies, CO2 is referred to regularly, particularly in regards to CCS, as CO2 is the fundamental underpinnings of the technology. Yet surprisingly little research has investigated levels of knowledge and understanding of CO2 and how this affects perceptions and understanding of energy technologies, especially CCS. With a sample of 2470 participants from three countries (Australia, the Netherlands and Japan), our research found respondents had a general understanding of CO2 but poor knowledge of its scientific dimensions. These misperceptions were directly related to misperceptions of CCS, yet indirectly related to their opinion on the implementation of the technology. It was found that providing information on the scientific characteristics of CO2 reduced misunderstanding of CCS and mitigated some change in opinion formation on CCS implementation. Overall, our research demonstrated that assumed knowledge of CO2 in the general public is partially flawed and has the potential to impact future dialogue and uptake of mitigation options.",
author = "Dowd, {Anne Maree} and Kenshi Itaoka and Peta Ashworth and Aya Saito and {de Best-Waldhober}, Marjolein",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.06.009",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "79--87",
journal = "International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control",
issn = "1750-5836",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS

T2 - An international study

AU - Dowd, Anne Maree

AU - Itaoka, Kenshi

AU - Ashworth, Peta

AU - Saito, Aya

AU - de Best-Waldhober, Marjolein

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - Discussions, opinions and decisions regarding options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions are often underpinned by an assumption that people know what carbon dioxide (CO2) is and how it behaves. Nevertheless, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest this is actually the case. Renewable energy technologies as well as technologies such as CO2 capture and storage (CCS) present potential solutions for mitigating the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In discussions and information provided on climate change and mitigation technologies, CO2 is referred to regularly, particularly in regards to CCS, as CO2 is the fundamental underpinnings of the technology. Yet surprisingly little research has investigated levels of knowledge and understanding of CO2 and how this affects perceptions and understanding of energy technologies, especially CCS. With a sample of 2470 participants from three countries (Australia, the Netherlands and Japan), our research found respondents had a general understanding of CO2 but poor knowledge of its scientific dimensions. These misperceptions were directly related to misperceptions of CCS, yet indirectly related to their opinion on the implementation of the technology. It was found that providing information on the scientific characteristics of CO2 reduced misunderstanding of CCS and mitigated some change in opinion formation on CCS implementation. Overall, our research demonstrated that assumed knowledge of CO2 in the general public is partially flawed and has the potential to impact future dialogue and uptake of mitigation options.

AB - Discussions, opinions and decisions regarding options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions are often underpinned by an assumption that people know what carbon dioxide (CO2) is and how it behaves. Nevertheless, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest this is actually the case. Renewable energy technologies as well as technologies such as CO2 capture and storage (CCS) present potential solutions for mitigating the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In discussions and information provided on climate change and mitigation technologies, CO2 is referred to regularly, particularly in regards to CCS, as CO2 is the fundamental underpinnings of the technology. Yet surprisingly little research has investigated levels of knowledge and understanding of CO2 and how this affects perceptions and understanding of energy technologies, especially CCS. With a sample of 2470 participants from three countries (Australia, the Netherlands and Japan), our research found respondents had a general understanding of CO2 but poor knowledge of its scientific dimensions. These misperceptions were directly related to misperceptions of CCS, yet indirectly related to their opinion on the implementation of the technology. It was found that providing information on the scientific characteristics of CO2 reduced misunderstanding of CCS and mitigated some change in opinion formation on CCS implementation. Overall, our research demonstrated that assumed knowledge of CO2 in the general public is partially flawed and has the potential to impact future dialogue and uptake of mitigation options.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903748272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903748272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.06.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.06.009

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84903748272

VL - 28

SP - 79

EP - 87

JO - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

JF - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

SN - 1750-5836

ER -