Investigation of possible situation of internalization of Salmonella Enteritidis in tomato fruits and bacterial survival during tomato plant cultivation

Tomoko Mishima, Nozomi Kido, Satoko Nakashima, Mami Yamakawa, Natsumi Miyaji, Kevin Webby Soli, Ken-ichi Honjoh, Md Latiful Bari, Takahisa Miyamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tomatoes have recently been implicated as an important vehicle in outbreaks of produce-associated salmonellosis. Traceback reports suggested that pre-harvest contamination of Salmonella enterica might be the main reason for these outbreaks; however, the site of pathogen attachment remains unclear. Therefore, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of Salmonella contamination of fresh produce. To trace the presence of Salmonella in soil and plants, Salmonella Enteritidis transformed with a pEGFP plasmid vector (S. Enteritidis-EGFP) was used. Soil was artificially contaminated with S. Enteritidis-EGFP at 104, 106 or 108 CFU/g, followed by cultivation of tomato plants in the contaminated soil. Samples of the soil and each organ of the tomato (fruit, stems/leaves, and root) were assayed for Salmonella by plating onto Tryptic Soy Agar and using the MPN method. Salmonella levels in the soil gradually decreased over time, and soil persistence was dependent on the initial inoculation level. Salmonella levels were below the detection limit (< 100 CFU/g) in fruits and stems/leaves, regardless of the level of soil contamination. Moreover, S. Enteritidis-EGFP was not detected in the tomato fruits after root injury. These results indicate that the internalization of Salmonella in tomato fruits might not occur after cultivation in contaminated soil.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-877
Number of pages9
JournalFood Science and Technology Research
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Salmonella enteritidis
Salmonella
Salmonella Enteritidis
Lycopersicon esculentum
Fruits
plant cultural practices
Fruit
Soil
tomatoes
plasmid vectors
fruits
Soils
polluted soils
Plasmids
soil
Contamination
Disease Outbreaks
stems
fresh produce
Salmonella enterica

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Marketing

Cite this

Investigation of possible situation of internalization of Salmonella Enteritidis in tomato fruits and bacterial survival during tomato plant cultivation. / Mishima, Tomoko; Kido, Nozomi; Nakashima, Satoko; Yamakawa, Mami; Miyaji, Natsumi; Soli, Kevin Webby; Honjoh, Ken-ichi; Bari, Md Latiful; Miyamoto, Takahisa.

In: Food Science and Technology Research, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.01.2012, p. 869-877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mishima, Tomoko ; Kido, Nozomi ; Nakashima, Satoko ; Yamakawa, Mami ; Miyaji, Natsumi ; Soli, Kevin Webby ; Honjoh, Ken-ichi ; Bari, Md Latiful ; Miyamoto, Takahisa. / Investigation of possible situation of internalization of Salmonella Enteritidis in tomato fruits and bacterial survival during tomato plant cultivation. In: Food Science and Technology Research. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 869-877.
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